compositor

(redirected from compositorial)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

com·pos·i·tor

 (kəm-pŏz′ĭ-tər)
n.
One that sets written material into type; a typesetter.

[Middle English compositur, one who composes, settler of disputes, from Anglo-Norman compositour, from Latin, writer, compiler, from compōnere, composit-, to put together; see component.]

com·pos′i·to′ri·al (-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

compositor

(kəmˈpɒzɪtə)
n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a person who sets and corrects type and generally assembles text and illustrations for printing. Sometimes shortened to: comp
compositorial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

com•pos•i•tor

(kəmˈpɒz ɪ tər)

n.
a person who sets the type or text for printing.
[1560–70; < Latin: one who composes]
com•pos`i•to′ri•al (-ˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compositor - one who sets written material into typecompositor - one who sets written material into type
pressman, printer - someone whose occupation is printing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

compositor

[kəmˈpɒzɪtəʳ] Ncajista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

compositor

[kəmˈpɒzɪtər] ncompositeur/trice m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

compositor

n (Typ) → (Schrift)setzer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

compositor

[kəmˈpɒzɪtəʳ] n (Typ) → compositore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Typing work was distinct from compositorial labor, yet typists also engaged as readers with the texts they produced, and devised innovative and effective strategies for shepherding texts through the revision process.
The remarkable similarities in patterns for same-author plays examined by Oras suggest that punctuation marks, be they authorial or compositorial (Oras examined the earliest editions available for each play), "keep within the rhythmical climate of the time," (88) and are useful for identifying a dramatist's individual prosodic characteristics.
(32) The critic does not simply restore originary readings where they are clearly not the result of compositorial error, but rather, he endows them with modern meanings that can then enter into dialogue with the words on the page under the signature of "Shakespeare": Hawkes thereby recovers "indeterminacy" and "multiplicity" that are, he insists, "fostered by the First Folio text," but that have no objective "meanings" in themselves.
Even in cases where the individual's compositorial style favored O almost exclusively, we find indications that the particular compositor distinguished between the two forms.
(C1v) The 1612 edition removes (or does it miss?) the comma at the end of the first line and emends (or is this just a compositorial slip?) 'murtherer' to 'murther' in the third line of the quoted passage.
The lack of any other distinguishing marks rather suggests that the pagination reflects compositorial error, or else a simple mechanical distinction; that Pericles was obtained earlier than the other six.
I have my doubts about how much "puzzling" compositors went in for, since the instability of speech-prefixes in this instance is matched by an even greater instability in another play printed in Quarto in 1600 by James Roberts, not Valentine Simmes, The Merchant of Venice, where Lancelet appears variously as abbreviations of that name and "Clown," and where Shylock occasionally appears as "Iewe." In this case, compositorial practice interferes with what may have been the contents of the manuscript presented to the printing house, and in a third case, which 1 shall discuss in my forthcoming Arden edition of the play, appears to have led successive editors up the garden path.
Sayce, "Compositorial Practice and the Localization of Printed Books, 1530-1800," The Library, 5th Series, XXI, 1 (March 1966): 1-45; on 3-4, 6, 17, 38-9, 30-31.
('Verta.' in the exit direction is clearly a compositorial error for 'Verdo.' The F2 text of the play reads 'Vet." for 'Verta.' [2Z3r].)
(Tit.): forrest/Forest/Forrest (677); Here/Heere/Here (1241): such variations can only be compositorial. Further, whereas variation of phonemes usually involving vowels inside words are generally useful to linguists as possible indications of shifts in pronunciation, in a different context words that may be subject to contraction in the printing house are more illuminating: the spellings hadde and had, for instance, do not indicate different pronunciations.
Folio punctuation is compositorial, but it is useful as a contemporary interpretation of the speeches' rhetorical pointing.
As a result of this rigid compositorial ethic, Goeyvaerts arrived at the cross-structure as the ideal incarnation of absolute balance, as convincingly shown by the analyses of Herman Sabbe and Mark Delaere.