compound leaf


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compound leaf
left: pinnately compound leaf
right: palmately compound leaf

compound leaf

n.
A leaf whose blade is divided into two or more distinct leaflets.

compound leaf

n
(Botany) a leaf consisting of two or more leaflets borne on the same leafstalk

compound leaf

A leaf that is composed of two or more leaflets on a common stalk. Clover, roses, sumac, and walnut trees have compound leaves.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compound leaf - a leaf composed of a number of leaflets on a common stalkcompound leaf - a leaf composed of a number of leaflets on a common stalk
foliage, leaf, leafage - the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants
trifoliolate leaf - having three leaflets
quinquefoliate leaf - a compound leaf having five leaflets
palmate leaf - a leaf resembling an open hand; having lobes radiating from a common point
pinnate leaf - a leaf resembling a feather; having the leaflets on each side of a common axis
decompound leaf - a leaf having divisions that are themselves compound
References in periodicals archive ?
From 5 plants per treatment, the second juvenile leaf (JL) and the first compound leaf (CL) were collected when they were fully developed.
Thus, the spines have been interpreted as: (a) as an odd-pinnately compound leaf in which each leaflet is reduced to a spine (Schmidt, 1928); (b) a dual organ in which the central spine would correspond to the lamina, and the lateral ones to the stipules (e.g., Bell, 1991, 2008); (c) as transformed branches in which the lateral spines would represent reduced leaves, and the central spine would represent an unfolded and reduced short shoot (Croizat, 1960); or (d) as outgrowth from single epidermal cells (Harvey-Gibson & Horsman, 1919).
Bertin holds a compound leaf from a shagbark hickory tree at Cookson Park in Worcester.
They have a pinnately compound leaf with three leaflets.
The arrangement of the leaflets of a compound leaf can be pinnately compound (with leaflets arranged along the length of a central stalk) or palmately compound (with the leaflets attached to the end of the petiole like the fingers radiating from the palm of the hand).
As mentioned, once a student can recognise what a leaf is they can usually tell the difference between a simple and compound leaf, but can have difficulty determining the type of compound leaf.
A compound leaf is composed of more than a single blade.
I doubt that a minute fraction of the 300-some students that passed through my labs could tell you today what a monocot or a dicot is, or even the difference between a simple and compound leaf. They memorized the details long enough to pass the quizzes and exams, and then that information was sent directly to the recycle bin in their brains.
The early population peak is usually much lower (<30 per compound leaf) than the late season peak which can reach >100 per compound leaf.