compromising


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com·pro·mise

 (kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. com·pro·mised, com·pro·mis·ing, com·pro·mis·es
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

[Middle English compromis, from Old French, from Latin comprōmissum, mutual promise, from neuter past participle of comprōmittere, to promise mutually : com-, com- + prōmittere, to promise; see promise.]

com′pro·mis′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

compromising

(ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪŋ)
adj
damaging to a person's reputation
ˈcomproˌmisingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.compromising - making or willing to make concessions; "loneliness tore through him...whenever he thought of...even the compromising Louis du Tillet"
uncompromising, inflexible, sturdy - not making concessions; "took an uncompromising stance in the peace talks"; "uncompromising honesty"
2.compromising - vulnerable to danger especially of discredit or suspicion; "she found herself in a compromising situation"
vulnerable - susceptible to attack; "a vulnerable bridge"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

compromising

[ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪŋ] ADJ [situation] → comprometedor; [mind, spirit] → acomodaticio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

compromising

[ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪŋ] adj [picture, information, situation] → compromettant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

compromising

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

compromising

[ˈkɒmprəmaɪzɪŋ] adjcompromettente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I was a fool to think of compromising. Letheringham is a nerveless leader.
There is nothing compromising in the name of a town.
"Because his majesty gives way sometimes to jest very compromising for his servants; and jesting, my lord, is a weapon that seriously wounds men of the sword, as we are."
He could do nothing with them, and they were rather compromising. That night he took them back to the chateau.
It may be that Larsan, who, since his three attempts, has had everything in training to cast suspicion on Monsieur Darzac, had fixed on just those occasions for a meeting with Monsieur Darzac at a spot most compromising. Larsan is cunning enough to have done that."
They were extremely compromising, which explains his distress at the time when we spoke to him about them.
Was there another path to the same goal without compromising? Maybe I didn't give enough?
Families with children were particularly likely to feel remorse over compromising on location, with 38 per cent of those who had chosen a different location now ruing their decisions.
Families with children were particularly likely to feel remorse over compromising on location, with 38% of those who had chosen a different location now ruing their decisions.
Pollsters have found that most voters support their elected officials compromising rather than sticking to principle when forced to make the choice.