compulsive

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com·pul·sive

 (kəm-pŭl′sĭv)
adj.
1. Having the capacity to compel: a frightening, compulsive novel.
2. Psychology Caused or conditioned by compulsion or obsession.
n.
A person with behavior patterns governed by a compulsion.

com·pul′sive·ly adv.
com·pul′sive·ness, com′pul·siv′i·ty (kŏm′pŭl-sĭv′ĭ-tē, kəm-) n.

compulsive

(kəmˈpʌlsɪv)
adj
relating to or involving compulsion
n
(Psychiatry) psychiatry an individual who is subject to a psychological compulsion
comˈpulsively adv
comˈpulsiveness, compulsivity n

com•pul•sive

(kəmˈpʌl sɪv)

adj.
1. pertaining to, characterized by, or involving compulsion: compulsive eating.
2. characterized by perfectionism, rigidity, conscientiousness, and an obsessive concern with order and detail.
3. compelling; compulsory.
n.
4. a compulsive person.
[1595–1605]
com•pul′sive•ly, adv.
com•pul′sive•ness, com•pul•siv•i•ty (kəm pʌlˈsɪv ɪ ti, ˌkɒm pʌl-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.compulsive - a person with a compulsive disposition; someone who feels compelled to do certain things
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
control freak - someone with a compulsive desire to exert control over situations and people
exhibitionist, flasher - someone with a compulsive desire to expose the genitals
perfectionist - a person who is displeased by anything that does not meet very high standards
workaholic - person with a compulsive need to work
Adj.1.compulsive - caused by or suggestive of psychological compulsion; "compulsive drinking"
psychoneurotic, neurotic - affected with emotional disorder
2.compulsive - strongly motivated to succeed
ambitious - having a strong desire for success or achievement

compulsive

adjective
3. irresistible, overwhelming, compelling, urgent, neurotic, besetting, uncontrollable, driving He seems to have an almost compulsive desire to play tricks.
Translations
kompulsiv

compulsive

[kəmˈpʌlsɪv] ADJcompulsivo
see also viewing

compulsive

[kəmˈpʌlsɪv] adj
(PSYCHOLOGY, PSYCHIATRY) [gambler, eater, spender, shopper] → compulsif/ive; [behaviour] → obsessionnel(le)
compulsive eating → troubles du comportement alimentaire
(= habitual) → invétéré(e)
(= fascinating) it's compulsive reading [book] → c'est un livre fascinant
it's compulsive viewing [TV programme] → c'est un programme fascinant

compulsive

adjzwanghaft, Zwangs-; neurosisZwangs-; behaviourzwanghaft; the compulsive buying of …der krankhafte Zwang, … zu kaufen; compulsive buying as a form of diseaseKaufzwang, eine Art Krankheit; he has a compulsive desire to …er steht unter dem Zwang, zu …; he is a compulsive eater/shopperer hat die Esssucht/Kaufsucht, er leidet an einem Esszwang/Kaufzwang; he is a compulsive liarer hat einen krankhaften Trieb zu lügen; she’s a compulsive talkersie muss unbedingt reden; it makes compulsive reading/viewingdas muss man einfach lesen/sehen; this compulsive TV-watching ruins every conversationdiese ständige Fernseherei zerstört jede Unterhaltung!

compulsive

[kəmˈpʌlsɪv] adj
a. (Psych) (desire, behaviour) → incontrollabile; (liar) → patologico/a
he's a compulsive drinker/smoker/gambler → ha il vizio del fumo/del bere/del gioco
b. (novel, film) → avvincente

com·pul·sive

a. compulsorio-a, compulsivo-a; obsesivo-a.

compulsive

adj compulsivo
References in periodicals archive ?
London, July 23 ( ANI ): Scientists have identified circuitry in the brain that drives compulsive drinking in rats.
I would suggest, having in mind the abusive relationship she was in, having in mind that she was having difficulty with compulsive eating and compulsive drinking, that would go some way to explaining the compulsive stealing and compulsive spending.
The movie offers lurid details of compulsive drinking and delirium tremens (D.
Unlike compulsive drinking or gambling, OCD does not give the person pleasure.
Multi-item questionnaires include the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (Anton et al.
The debate about compulsive gambling, like that about other self-destructive or socially unacceptable behaviors ranging from compulsive drinking to compulsive shopping (a supposed new disorder whose advocates urge its inclusion in the next revision of psychiatry's diagnostic manual), ultimately comes down to a single question: Should individuals who engage in these behaviors be excused on the grounds that they suffer from a disorder that produces urges they are unable to resist?