computer typesetting

Related to computer typesetting: typesetter, Computerized Typesetting

computer typesetting

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a system for the high-speed composition of type by a device driven by punched paper tape or magnetic tape that has been processed by a computer
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Michael Barnett, who ran the Cooperative Computing Laboratory at MIT, published Computer Typesetting: Experiments and Prospects in 1965, (28) documenting his experimentation with computerized typesetting.
In an age in which computer typesetting permits the placement of notes anywhere, it is simply unacceptable to use end notes and force the reader to flip back and forth many times in order to read a complete thought.
Since then the newspaper has gone from "hot type" (castings from molten lead) to "cold type" (type set photographically) to computer typesetting in which everything is done on a screen.
Services: Newsletters, brochures, booklets, letterheads, envelopes, business cards, computer typesetting, flyers, 4-color work, menus, placemats, notecards and imagesetter film from disk
I spotted one incipit where the computer typesetting went crazy (S53/3), a very few typographical errors, and a few bibliographical abbreviations that were not explained.
Created with very little money, Rocappi researched and developed computer typesetting techniques and eventually served as the world's first commercial computer typesetting service bureau.
"Since then computer typesetting and offset lithography have completely replaced the traditional letterpress process and digital printing is becoming an everyday occurrence," says Peter.
The paper had news bureaus in Africa, a United Nations correspondent, and in the early 1970s used computer typesetting and a Goss offset four-color press in production that was state-of-the-art.
As it is, without computer typesetting and a plastic substitute for the traditional boxwood (Resingrave, a slight variation on the formula for lawn furniture) the project would have been prohibitively expensive.
Beyond using their datafiles for computer typesetting of the printed publications, the datafile producers also license their datafiles to third parties who process these datafiles and make them available online or on CD-ROM.
Furthermore, in the age of computer typesetting it is inexcusable to relegate footnotes to the end of the book rather than put them at the foot of the page to which they belong.

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