computerdom

computerdom

(kəmˈpjuːtədəm)
n
(Computer Science) informal the computer industry
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1970, social critic and historian of technology Lewis Mumford predicted that the goal of what he termed "computerdom" would be "(https://www.boundary2.org/2018/07/loeb/) to furnish and process an endless quantity of data , in order to expand the role and ensure the domination of the power system." That same year a (https://www.wired.com/story/silicon-valley-tyranny-of-structurelessness/) seminal essay by feminist thinker Jo Freeman  warned about the (https://jofreeman.com/joreen/tyranny.htm) inherent power imbalances  that remained in systems that appeared to make everyone equal.
Cloud computing is the latest incarnation of an old concept in computerdom, the use of remote computer services.
Out came placards and black flags (symbolising mourning, for this was but a token strike, a hopeless gesture against the sweeping tide of computerdom.)
So, it should come as no surprise that the 800-pound gorilla of computerdom, Microsoft, is moving heavily into mobile technology.
As nothing is so constant as change in the realm of computerdom, it would be foolish to be doctrinaire about such matters, so a digital edition should be designed, as much as possible, to adapt to such changes and especially to be accessible to several kinds of potential users - our scholar in the so-called "third world" as well as the privileged American student.
Sponsored by The Computer Museum and presented by ACM, the Bowl -- a benefit for the Museum's educational programs -- has become computerdom's own celebrity classic event.
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