conacre


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conacre

(kʌˈneːkər)
n
(Agriculture) Irish farming land let for a season or for eleven months
[C19: from corn1 + acre]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Cartwright, partner at Saffery Champness and a member of the firm's landed estates and rural business group, said: "Whilst the case in question, John Carlisle Allen, centred on a Conacre arrangement in Northern Ireland, it still has significance elsewhere in the UK.
Prior to 1845 there were social tensions in the city because of an increase in population and efforts to use conacre (the letting of a small plot of land for growing potatoes) as a prophylactic against unrest did not work as the census data reveals that many problems were associated with living in a large urban centre.
After confiscation, the land could be let to conacre tenants considered more reliable and more productive.
At the time of her death, the land was let for grazing to neighbouring farmers ("Conacre" in Northern Ireland) with a small amount of maintenance being carried out by her son-in-law.
Derek Lutton and Bill Beckett found falling Conacre rents encouraged landowners to seek sources of income other than letting land to neighbouring farmers.
This was "an important time for an agrarian society to make a statement of its intent towards those who might transgress in the future, those, for example, who might agree to pay more for conacre than the local economy could sustain in a time of deepening economic crisis" (119).
The third phase in the struggle for land was the 'agrarian bolshevism' of the 1919-20 period for access to conacre land as survival.