concede

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concede

yielding without necessarily agreeing: He conceded the election before all the votes were in.
Not to be confused with:
accede – assent or yield; give consent; agree: accede to the terms of the agreement; to attain an office; succeed: accede to the throne
exceed – to go beyond the bounds: exceed the speed limit; outdo; beat
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

con·cede

 (kən-sēd′)
v. con·ced·ed, con·ced·ing, con·cedes
v.tr.
1. To acknowledge, often reluctantly, as being true, just, or proper; admit: conceded that we made a mistake. See Synonyms at acknowledge.
2.
a. To acknowledge or admit (defeat).
b. To acknowledge defeat in: concede an election; concede a chess match.
3.
a. To yield or surrender (something owned or disputed, such as land): conceded the region when signing the treaty.
b. To yield or grant (a privilege or right, for example).
c. Sports To allow (a goal or point, for example) to be scored by the opposing team or player.
v.intr.
To make a concession or acknowledge defeat; yield: The losing candidate conceded after the polls had closed.

[French concéder, from Latin concēdere : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + cēdere, to yield; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

con·ced′ed·ly (-sē′dĭd-lē) adv.
con·ced′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

concede

(kənˈsiːd)
vb
1. (when tr, may take a clause as object) to admit or acknowledge (something) as true or correct
2. to yield or allow (something, such as a right)
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (tr) to admit as certain in outcome: to concede an election.
[C17: from Latin concēdere, from cēdere to give way, cede]
conˈcededly adv
conˈceder n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•cede

(kənˈsid)

v. -ced•ed, -ced•ing. v.t.
1. to acknowledge as true, just, or proper; admit, often grudgingly: He finally conceded that she was right.
2. to acknowledge (an opponent's victory, score, etc.) before it is officially established: to concede an election.
3. to grant as a right or privilege; yield.
v.i.
4. to make concession; yield; admit.
[1625–35; < Latin concēdere=con- con- + cēdere to withdraw, yield, cede]
con•ced′ed•ly, adv.
con•ced′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

concede


Past participle: conceded
Gerund: conceding

Imperative
concede
concede
Present
I concede
you concede
he/she/it concedes
we concede
you concede
they concede
Preterite
I conceded
you conceded
he/she/it conceded
we conceded
you conceded
they conceded
Present Continuous
I am conceding
you are conceding
he/she/it is conceding
we are conceding
you are conceding
they are conceding
Present Perfect
I have conceded
you have conceded
he/she/it has conceded
we have conceded
you have conceded
they have conceded
Past Continuous
I was conceding
you were conceding
he/she/it was conceding
we were conceding
you were conceding
they were conceding
Past Perfect
I had conceded
you had conceded
he/she/it had conceded
we had conceded
you had conceded
they had conceded
Future
I will concede
you will concede
he/she/it will concede
we will concede
you will concede
they will concede
Future Perfect
I will have conceded
you will have conceded
he/she/it will have conceded
we will have conceded
you will have conceded
they will have conceded
Future Continuous
I will be conceding
you will be conceding
he/she/it will be conceding
we will be conceding
you will be conceding
they will be conceding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conceding
you have been conceding
he/she/it has been conceding
we have been conceding
you have been conceding
they have been conceding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conceding
you will have been conceding
he/she/it will have been conceding
we will have been conceding
you will have been conceding
they will have been conceding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conceding
you had been conceding
he/she/it had been conceding
we had been conceding
you had been conceding
they had been conceding
Conditional
I would concede
you would concede
he/she/it would concede
we would concede
you would concede
they would concede
Past Conditional
I would have conceded
you would have conceded
he/she/it would have conceded
we would have conceded
you would have conceded
they would have conceded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.concede - admit (to a wrongdoing); "She confessed that she had taken the money"
acknowledge, admit - declare to be true or admit the existence or reality or truth of; "He admitted his errors"; "She acknowledged that she might have forgotten"
fess up, make a clean breast of, own up - admit or acknowledge a wrongdoing or error; "the writer of the anonymous letter owned up after they identified his handwriting"
2.concede - be willing to concede; "I grant you this much"
agree, concur, concord, hold - be in accord; be in agreement; "We agreed on the terms of the settlement"; "I can't agree with you!"; "I hold with those who say life is sacred"; "Both philosophers concord on this point"
forgive - stop blaming or grant forgiveness; "I forgave him his infidelity"; "She cannot forgive him for forgetting her birthday"
3.concede - give over; surrender or relinquish to the physical control of another
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
4.concede - acknowledge defeat; "The candidate conceded after enough votes had come in to show that he would lose"
surrender, give up - give up or agree to forgo to the power or possession of another; "The last Taleban fighters finally surrendered"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

concede

verb
1. admit, allow, accept, acknowledge, own, grant, confess She finally conceded that he was right.
admit deny, protest, reject, dispute, contest, refute, disclaim
2. give up, yield, hand over, surrender, relinquish, cede The central government has never conceded that territory to the Kurds.
give up beat, defeat, conquer, make a stand, fight to the bitter end
concede defeat capitulate, give up, yield, submit, surrender, give in, come to terms, succumb, cave in (informal), relent, throw in the towel I eventually had to concede defeat.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

concede

verb
1. To recognize, often reluctantly, the reality or truth of:
Slang: fess up.
Chiefly Regional: allow.
2. To let have as a favor, prerogative, or privilege:
3. To make a concession:
Idioms: give and take, go fifty-fifty, meet someone halfway.
4. To cease opposition:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يخوّل، يَمْنَحيُسلِّـم بِ، يُقـرُّ
připustitpřiznatuznat
afståindrømmeovergive
לוותרלקבל
játaleyfa
perleisti
atzītpiekāptiespieļaut

concede

[kənˈsiːd]
A. VT [+ point, argument] → reconocer, conceder; [+ game, territory] → ceder
to concede thatadmitir que
to concede defeatdarse por vencido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

concede

[kənˈsiːd]
vt
(= admit) [+ fact, point] → admettre, reconnaître
to concede defeat → s'avouer vaincu(e)
to concede (that) ... → concéder que ..., reconnaître que ...
[+ goal] → concéder; [+ penalty] → concéder
vicéder
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

concede

vt
(= yield, give up) privilegeaufgeben; landsabtreten (→ to an +acc); to concede a right to somebodyjdm ein Recht überlassen; to concede victory to somebodyvor jdm kapitulieren; to concede a match (= give up)aufgeben, sich geschlagen geben; (= lose)ein Match abgeben; to concede a penaltyeinen Elfmeter verursachen; to concede a point to somebodyjdm in einem Punkt recht geben; (Sport) → einen Punkt an jdn abgeben
(= admit, grant)zugeben, einräumen (form); privilegeeinräumen (to sb jdm); rightzubilligen, zugestehen (to sb jdm); it’s generally conceded that …es ist allgemein anerkannt, dass …; to concede defeatsich geschlagen geben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

concede

[kənˈsiːd]
1. vt (admit, point, defeat) → ammettere; (argument) → riconoscere la validità di; (territory) → cedere
to concede victory → darla vinta
2. vicedere
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

concede

(kənˈsiːd) verb
1. to admit. He conceded that he had been wrong.
2. to grant (eg a right).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
* togliere a sicurare (LXXIX, 14): concedere un salvacondotto a qualcuno.
Ecco che i media hanno contribuito a creare o, a tutto concedere, hanno dato risonanza ad una esigenza di riforma del sistema penale in materia.
Permettere agli studenti di esprimere questi passaggi per mezzo del supporto visivo garantisce loro, in primo luogo, di visualizzare il proverbio e di contestualizzarlo--e non solo di descriverlo verbalmente--e, in secondo luogo, di elicitare la capacita di astrazione metaforica e di concedere spazio alia capacita creativa e all'emotivita (Danesi 1987: 386) (25).
Anche altri esperti canonisti, dopo avere sintetizzato i connotati della controversia giuridica di cui ci occupiamo, inclinano nella direzione di non concedere ai Superiori maggiori il potere de quo.
Una conoscenza che, snaturato l'assunto socratico del conosci te stesso, affiancandolo all'essenza, vuole concedere a questo ricercarsi una impossibile consistenza che non sfugge alla radicale negazione dell'essere, cosa a cui Michelstaedter giunge proprio attraverso la negazione della sostanzialita della coscienza.
Questo non solo perche Parmenide, precedendo cronologicamente Melisso, e visto come l'iniziatore di quella linea di pensiero, e quindi tra i due il filosofo piu originale, ma anche per l'effettiva complessita della sua opera, anche sotto l'aspetto stilistico: Parmenide, come noto, scrive infatti in versi, a differenza di Melisso, la cui prosa asciutta sembra richiedere un minore sforzo esegetico e quindi concedere maggiore spazio ad un studio di tipo comparativo.
Di conseguenza, si verifica la relegazione dell'arte militare in quella classe che poteva permettersi di perfezionarla e di concedere tempo e spazio alla sua pratica.