concierge medicine


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Related to concierge medicine: Boutique Medicine

concierge medicine

n.
A health care arrangement in which patients pay an enrollment fee in order to receive care at a medical practice.
References in periodicals archive ?
22 July 2019 - New York, US-based concierge medicine services Concierge Choice Physicians (CCP) has acquired Georgia, US-based concierge and direct primary care service provider Private Practice Direct (PPD) to expand CCP's market to nearly 30 states and launch its entry into direct primary care, the company said.
"What we do is called 'concierge medicine', and what is unique is that our model is based on the niche information that only an insider has.
Nostalgia Family Medicine is a direct primary care (DPC) practice offering concierge medicine. Patients can text or call Dr.
Such practices may be called Direct Primary Care, Concierge Medicine, or simply Fee-for-Service.
Regulars of CMI will tell you that the center still maintains its concierge medicine approach.
Such practices may be called Direct Primary Care (DPC), Concierge Medicine, or simply "Fee-For-Service." Before the 1980s when managed care came to dominate, patients paid doctors directly.
"This is concierge medicine for normal people," said the 61-year-old family physician.
The new site will offer advanced imaging services, primary care, pediatric and concierge medicine along with a wide variety of specialty services.
Although commentators often use the two terms interchangeably, direct practices and concierge medicine are not always the same.
Tom Blue, chief strategy officer of the American Academy of Private Physicians, a group that represents physicians in direct patient-contracting practices, suggested that concierge medicine is not out of reach, even for lower-income populations.
The 2012 national survey of almost 14,000 physicians conducted by physician staffing firm Merritt Hawkins for the National Physicians Foundation found that 9.6% of owners of practices were planning to convert to concierge medicine. This finding was not surprising since a 2010 AMA survey of 9000 physicians who care for Medicare patients indicated that 20% of physicians are already restricting the number of Medicare patients in the practice.