conclusive


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Related to conclusive: inconclusive, conclusive proof

con·clu·sive

 (kən-klo͞o′sĭv)
adj.
Serving to put an end to doubt, question, or uncertainty; decisive: conclusive evidence. See Synonyms at decisive.

con·clu′sive·ly adv.
con·clu′sive·ness n.

conclusive

(kənˈkluːsɪv)
adj
1. putting an end to doubt; decisive; final
2. approaching or involving an end or conclusion
conˈclusively adv
conˈclusiveness n

con•clu•sive

(kənˈklu sɪv)

adj.
1. serving to settle or decide a question; decisive: conclusive evidence.
2. tending to terminate; closing.
[1580–90; < Late Latin]
con•clu′sive•ly, adv.
con•clu′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.conclusive - forming an end or termination; especially putting an end to doubt or question; "conclusive proof"; "the evidence is conclusive"
decisive - determining or having the power to determine an outcome; "cast the decisive vote"; "two factors had a decisive influence"
inconclusive - not conclusive; not putting an end to doubt or question; "an inconclusive reply"; "inconclusive evidence"; "the inconclusive committee vote"

conclusive

conclusive

adjective
1. Determining or having the power to determine an outcome:
2. Serving the function of deciding or settling with finality:
3. Having or arising from authority:
Translations
přesvědčivý
konkluderende
sannfærandi

conclusive

[kənˈkluːsɪv] ADJ [answer, victory] → concluyente, decisivo; [proof] → concluyente

conclusive

[kənˈkluːsɪv] adj [evidence, proof, results, answer, study] → concluant(e); [victory] → large, net(nette); [argument] → concluant(e), définitif/ive

conclusive

adj (= convincing)schlüssig, überzeugend; (= decisive, final)endgültig; (Jur) evidenceeinschlägig; proofschlüssig, eindeutig

conclusive

[kənˈkluːsɪv] adjconclusivo/a

conclude

(kənˈkluːd) verb
1. to come or bring to an end. to conclude a meeting; He concluded by thanking everyone.
2. to come to believe. We concluded that you weren't coming.
conˈclusion (-ʒən) noun
1. an end. the conclusion of his speech.
2. a judgement. I came to the conclusion that the house was empty.
conˈclusive (-siv) adjective
convincing. conclusive proof.
conˈclusively adverb
conˈclusiveness noun
References in classic literature ?
It would be better to avoid it by omitting all mention of my Revelation, and by proceeding on the path of Demonstration -- which after all, seemed so simple and so conclusive that nothing would be lost by discarding the former means.
"Yes, yes, too conclusive," continued Poirot, almost to himself.
The more attentively I consider and investigate the reasons which appear to have given birth to this opinion, the more I become convinced that they are cogent and conclusive.
In some of them it may, perhaps, as a single experiment, made under circumstances somewhat peculiar, be thought to be not absolutely conclusive. But as applied to the case under consideration, it involves some facts, which I venture to remark, as a complete and satisfactory illustration of the reasoning which I have employed.
I sauntered away, but when I returned he was still there, which seemed conclusive proof that he had smoked my purpose.
In order to work out the whole subject theoretically and to complete his book, which, in Levin's daydreams, was not merely to effect a revolution in political economy, but to annihilate that science entirely and to lay the foundation of a new science of the relation of the people to the soil, all that was left to do was to make a tour abroad, and to study on the spot all that had been done in the same direction, and to collect conclusive evidence that all that had been done there was not what was wanted.
Experience is the oracle of truth; and where its responses are unequivocal, they ought to be conclusive and sacred.
Zeena took the view that Mattie was bound to make the best of Starkfield since she hadn't any other place to go to; but this did not strike Ethan as conclusive. Zeena, at any rate, did not apply the principle in her own case.
"If it weren't that I had conclusive evidence to prove what I was doing there, he seemed rather set on getting me into trouble."
There was but one assailable p oint in this otherwise conclusive evidence.
The one is from long experience, and the other is from nature; which last, I presume, is often meant by genius, or great natural parts; and it is infinitely the better of the two, not only as we are masters of it much earlier in life, but as it is much more infallible and conclusive; for a man who hath been imposed on by ever so many, may still hope to find others more honest; whereas he who receives certain necessary admonitions from within, that this is impossible, must have very little understanding indeed, if he ever renders himself liable to be once deceived.
Place me on the coasts beyond the tropics -- place me where the wind blows toward the shore in the day-time, and toward the sea by night -- and I instantly advance toward conclusive experiments.