concordance

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con·cor·dance

 (kən-kôr′dns)
n.
1. Agreement; concord.
2. An alphabetical index of all the words in a text or corpus of texts, showing every contextual occurrence of a word: a concordance of Shakespeare's works.
3. Genetics The presence of a given trait in both members of a pair of twins.

concordance

(kənˈkɔːdəns)
n
1. a state or condition of agreement or harmony
2. (Library Science & Bibliography) a book that indexes the principal words in a literary work, often with the immediate context and an account of the meaning
3. (Library Science & Bibliography) an index produced by computer or machine, alphabetically listing every word in a text
4. an alphabetical list of subjects or topics

con•cord•ance

(kɒnˈkɔr dns, kən-)

n.
1. agreement; concord; harmony.
2. an alphabetical index of the principal words or topics of a book.
3. (in genetic studies) the degree of similarity in a pair of twins with respect to the presence or absence of a particular disease or trait.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Medieval Latin concordantia. See concord, -ance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.concordance - a harmonious state of things in general and of their properties (as of colors and sounds); congruity of parts with one another and with the whole
order - established customary state (especially of society); "order ruled in the streets"; "law and order"
peace - harmonious relations; freedom from disputes; "the roommates lived in peace together"
comity - a state or atmosphere of harmony or mutual civility and respect
accord, agreement - harmony of people's opinions or actions or characters; "the two parties were in agreement"
2.concordance - agreement of opinions
agreement - the verbal act of agreeing
3.concordance - an index of all main words in a book along with their immediate contexts
index - an alphabetical listing of names and topics along with page numbers where they are discussed

concordance

noun
Translations

concordance

[kənˈkɔːdəns] N
1. (= agreement) → concordancia f
2. (= index, book) → concordancias fpl

concordance

n
(= agreement)Übereinstimmung f; in concordance with your specifications (form)Ihren Angaben or Anweisungen gemäß
(Bibl, Liter) → Konkordanz f
References in classic literature ?
The weight of the insect was very remarkable, and, taking all things into consideration, I could hardly blame Jupiter for his opinion respecting it; but what to make of Legrand's concordance with that opinion, I could not, for the life of me, tell.
But researchers were slower to compile authorial concordances in Urdu.
The perfect concordances among observers determined on technical quality of the films were on respiratory phases, the exclusion of the scapulae and visualization of apices, respectively.
Computerized concordances can help resolve the lack of authentic materials by bringing authenticity into the classroom (Wu, Witten and Franken 2010).
(2) Therefore, assessing the sensitivity, specificity, and the stage and grade concordances of endoscopic biopsy are important toward determining the proper treatment for patients with urothelial carcinoma of the ureter, renal pelvis, or ureteropelvic junction.
The essays concern English Bible translations and translation theory; a Bible study method that M calls "Phrasing" (two essays); using reference books (e.g., concordances) and computer Bible software; word studies; how to read a Bible commentary; and textual criticism.
There are several concordances that alleviate many of the problems faced by scholars working with this archive.
Appendices include archaeological provenance; concordances of former collections, galleries, and donors; a concordance of Beazley numbers; and attributions to painters, groups, classes, and styles.
The Concordanza dei versi puerili e delle poesie varie di Giacomo Leopardi completes the work that Savoca started on the poetic corpus of Leopardi in 1994--with the concordance of the Canti--and continued with the concordances of the Paralipomeni (1998) and Traduzioni poetiche (2003).
As a consequence of the limited amount of data, and the variety of features that the concordances revealed, quantitative information could only play a minor role in the concordance analysis.