concubitus

Translations

concubitus

n. L. concúbito.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
si enim aliquo diuturno et insanabili morbo corporis teneatur coniux, quo concubitus impeditur?
78r/ carry in themselves an indecorum and undecency or turpitude are contrary to this Natural Law: Such are (j) immodesty, impudence, Obsenity of Language uncleannes vagus et illicitus concubitus obsceni ponderis propalam (k) et publice depositu, pudendorum develatio [irregular and unlawful sexual intercourse, bringing forth openly and publicly what is of obscene consequence, the uncovering of private parts], Lying, ridiculous and discompos'd gestures: Those seem to be contra decorum et dignitatem humanae naturae [contrary to the decency and dignity of human nature].
(96.) Ulpien D.35.1.15 in fine : nuptias enim non concubitus, sed consensus facit.
The authors excuse on stylistic grounds their own departures from using historical terminology when they discuss sexual acts prior to the nineteenth century, when the term 'sex' began to refer to sexual intercourse: "coitus, concubitus or l'acte venerien do not have a winning ring, and sex has the additional advantage of alluding to the penumbra of erotic phenomena (such as desire, arousal, connotation, representation, imagination) as well as the physical act or ...
Other passages, however, do shed more light on this question, including 'odi concubitus qui non utrumque resolvunt; / hoc est cur pueri tangar amore minus' ("I hate sexual encounters that don't satisfy both parties.
On Philenis, who "hat zwar ausfuhrlich / doch sehr schandlich Varios Concubitus beschrieben" 'very thoroughly but scandalously described Varios Concubitus [diverse manners of sexual intercourse],' see Eberti 282-82; on Elephantis, who "hat viele Carmina de variis Concubitus Generibus geschrieben" 'wrote many Carmine de variis concubitus generibus [songs of diverse manners of intercourse],' see Eberti 131-32.
Consent, not cohabitation, makes a marriage (Consensus non concubitus facit matrimonium).
154,11), or else as concubitus masculorum, men's sleeping together (Jordan 146), which may designate a wider range of sexual practices.
The same poet elsewhere observes in passing that he personally prefers women on practical and admittedly altruistic grounds, but his phrasing is significant: 'odd concubitus qui non utrumque resolvunt; / hoc est cur pueri tangar amore minus' (Ars 2.683 4).