condemnation


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Related to condemnation: Condemnation Proceedings

con·dem·na·tion

 (kŏn′dĕm-nā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of condemning.
b. The state of being condemned.
2. Severe reproof; strong censure.
3. A reason or occasion for condemning.

con•dem•na•tion

(ˌkɒn dɛmˈneɪ ʃən, -dəm-)

n.
1. the act of condemning, esp. by law.
2. the state of being condemned.
3. strong censure.
4. a reason for condemning.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.condemnation - an expression of strong disapproval; pronouncing as wrong or morally culpable; "his uncompromising condemnation of racism"
disapproval - the expression of disapproval
animadversion, censure - harsh criticism or disapproval
demonisation, demonization - to represent as diabolically evil; "the demonization of our enemies"
2.condemnation - (law) the act of condemning (as land forfeited for public use) or judging to be unfit for use (as a food product or an unsafe building)
disapproval - the act of disapproving or condemning
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.condemnation - an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil on someone or some group
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
anathema - a formal ecclesiastical curse accompanied by excommunication
imprecation, malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult); "he suffered the imprecations of the mob"
4.condemnation - the condition of being strongly disapproved of; "he deserved nothing but condemnation"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
5.condemnation - (criminal law) a final judgment of guilty in a criminal case and the punishment that is imposed; "the conviction came as no surprise"
final decision, final judgment - a judgment disposing of the case before the court; after the judgment (or an appeal from it) is rendered all that remains is to enforce the judgment
murder conviction - conviction for murder
rape conviction - conviction for rape
robbery conviction - conviction for robbery
criminal law - the body of law dealing with crimes and their punishment

condemnation

noun denunciation, blame, censure, disapproval, reproach, stricture, reproof, reprobation, denouncement There was widespread condemnation of Saturday's killings.

condemnation

noun
A comment expressing fault:
Informal: pan.
Slang: knock.
Translations
شَجْب ، اسْتِنكار، إدانَه
odsouzení
fordømmelse
megbélyegzés
fordæming; dómur
obsodba
ayıplamakınamalânetleme

condemnation

[ˌkɒndemˈneɪʃən] N (= sentencing) → condena f; (= censure) → censura f

condemnation

[ˌkɒndɛmˈneɪʃən] n (= criticism) → condamnation f

condemnation

n
Verurteilung f; (fig also)Verdammung f; what a condemnationwas für ein Armutszeugnis
(of slums, ship)Kondemnation f (spec); the new council was responsible for the immediate condemnation of some of the old city slumsdie neue Stadtverwaltung war dafür verantwortlich, dass einige der alten Slums sofort auf die Abrissliste kamen
(US Jur) → Beschlagnahme f; (of land)Enteignung f

condemnation

[ˌkɒndɛmˈneɪʃn] ncondanna

condemn

(kənˈdem) verb
1. to criticize as morally wrong or evil. Everyone condemned her for being cruel to her child.
2. to sentence to (a punishment). She was condemned to death.
3. to declare (a building) to be unfit to use. These houses have been condemned.
condemnation (kondemˈneiʃən) noun
condemned cell
a cell for a prisoner under sentence of death.
References in classic literature ?
Political judgments are generally vain formalities, for the same passions which give rise to the accusation ordain to the condemnation. Such is the atrocious logic of revolutions.
The young men who belonged to the Progressive Euchre Club used to drop in late and risk a tiff with their sweethearts and general condemnation for a waltz with `the hired girls.'
The Emperor was inflexible both to the entreaties of his daughter and the tears of his grand-children, and all that could be obtained of him was that the sentence should be mollified, and changed into a condemnation to be hanged.
Neither is the moral justification or condemnation of conduct aimed at here.
As the concurrence of two thirds of the Senate will be requisite to a condemnation, the security to innocence, from this additional circumstance, will be as complete as itself can desire.
Can any one who has rejoiced in woman's tenderness think it a reproach to her that she took the little oval picture in her palm and made a bed for it there, and leaned her cheek upon it, as if that would soothe the creatures who had suffered unjust condemnation? She did not know then that it was Love who had come to her briefly, as in a dream before awaking, with the hues of morning on his wings-- that it was Love to whom she was sobbing her farewell as his image was banished by the blameless rigor of irresistible day.
That Syndicate of yours was a very smart stroke of business, no doubt, and it was clever of you to keep me in ignorance of it, but as things have turned out now, that will be your condemnation. They will say, why did you keep me in ignorance of this move, and the answer - why, it is very clear!
With Miss Cornelia the force of condemnation can no further go."
Hence I presume some persons who have not understood the original, and have seen the English translation of the primitive, have concluded that it meant judgment in the legal sense, in which it is frequently used as equivalent to condemnation.
The injustice of his sentence was very flagrant; all Paris was indignant; and it was judged that his religion and wealth rather than the crime alleged against him had been the cause of his condemnation.
In every line of the narrative he had heard, he had heard his condemnation. He had fully comprehended that no personal influence could possibly save him, that he was virtually sentenced by the millions, and that units could avail him nothing.
``Yet,'' said Rebecca, ``you sate a judge upon me, innocent most innocent as you knew me to be you concurred in my condemnation, and, if I aright understood, are yourself to appear in arms to assert my guilt, and assure my punishment.''