condign


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Related to condign: condignly

con·dign

 (kən-dīn′)
adj.
Deserved; adequate: "On sober reflection, such worries over a man's condign punishment seemed senseless" (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.).

[Middle English condigne, from Old French, from Latin condignus : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + dignus, worthy; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

con·dign′ly adv.

condign

(kənˈdaɪn)
adj
(esp of a punishment) fitting; deserved
[C15: from Old French condigne, from Latin condignus, from dignus worthy]
conˈdignly adv

con•dign

(kənˈdaɪn)

adj.
well-deserved; fitting; adequate: condign punishment.
[1375–1425; late Middle English condigne < Anglo-French, Middle French < Latin condignus=con- con- + dignus worthy; see dignity]
con•dign′ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.condign - fitting or appropriate and deserved; used especially of punishment; "condign censure"
deserved, merited - properly deserved; "a merited success"
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes he was upon the verge of tears, and again he was promising his listener either fabulous rewards or condign punishment; but the other was obdurate.
The profoundest deference was paid to Nicholas that night, and the people who had been most anxious to have his nose pulled in the morning, embraced occasions of taking him aside, and telling him with great feeling, how very friendly they took it that he should have treated that Lenville so properly, who was a most unbearable fellow, and on whom they had all, by a remarkable coincidence, at one time or other contemplated the infliction of condign punishment, which they had only been restrained from administering by considerations of mercy; indeed, to judge from the invariable termination of all these stories, there never was such a charitable and kind-hearted set of people as the male members of Mr Crummles's company.
The dwarf muttering a terrible oath looked round as if for some weapon with which to inflict condign punishment upon his disobedient wife.
My villains were the then as yet un-Americanized Russians who formed, in my mind, a condign conspiracy to strangle the infant Hercules of American ballet in his cradle.
Therefore there was a need, on the basis of the ground realities, to bring the terrorists within the purview of court martial and award them condign punishments.
This offence called for a deterrent sentence and condign punishment.
In short, poems that serve the purpose--finally--of helping us understand our natures and the world with a condign language expressive of the wisdom of our enduring intellectual traditions and refreshed by the immediacy of our contemporary experience.
In its instructive clarity, the play has been linked to accounts of the typically wittily condign forms of divine vengeance taken against "notorious sinners," most notably Thomas Beard's The Theatre of God's Judgments, which first appeared in 1597 and was revised and augmented several times thereafter.
It has been said on a number of occasions in recent years where people appear before court for sentences of this nature, they must expect condign punishment.
A "listory" (see von Contzen, "The Limits of Narration: Toward a Literary History of Lists" in this issue) of sorts is therefore a condign complement to the narratology of literary forms.
The message must go out that those involved in firearms offences must receive condign punishments from the court.
Punishment for such crimes should be condign, to send a message to other teenage thugs.