conditionalization

(redirected from conditionalisation)

conditionalization

(kənˌdɪʃənəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

conditionalisation

n
(Logic) logic the derivation from an argument of a conditional statement with the conjunction of the premises as antecedent and the conclusion as consequent. If the argument is valid, conditionalization yields a truth
References in periodicals archive ?
Emotions not only hurt truths, but also create a situation in which one creates or conceives one's own way of understanding truths probably not deeming it a process of post-truth conditionalisation, but a paradoxical behaviour where a majority does not accept a majority opinion.
That Bayesians allow for direct changes in conditional probabilities is attested by Williams's attempt ("Bayesian Conditionalisation and the Principle of Minimum Information", British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 31, 1980, pp.
How then are we to interpret conditionalisation over the ensemble?
1980]: 'Bayesian Conditionalisation and the Principle of Minimum Information', British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 31, pp.
A standard constraint on rational belief revision is that it proceed by conditionalisation (Jeffrey 1983, Ch.
What the revision argument demonstrates is that harmony so construed cannot generally be maintained given belief revision by conditionalisation.
Lewis employs "Jeffrey conditionalisation"--a generalization of the notion of Bayesian conditionalisation which permits belief revision even when one's change of information is not represented by coming to believe some proposition E with certainty.
Being rational, he changes his beliefs by conditionalisation, and makes consequent changes in his desires.
That credences in general change according to conditionalisation is a fundamental assumption of the revision argument.
It will be obvious by now that belief revision should not, in general, go by conditionalisation.
Wright argues that, given any discourse which shows the right kind of syntactic possibilities--the well-formed declarative sentences are closed under conditionalisation and negation, for example--and given also that the discourse is subject to sufficient discipline to constitute a practice of warranted assertion, then such a discourse may legitimately have a truth predicate applied to its declarative sentences--a truth predicate which displays the usual syntactic properties of embedding and commuting across logical operators.
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