conditioned suppression

conditioned suppression

n
(Psychology) psychol the reduction in the frequency of a learned response, e.g. pressing a bar for water, that occurs when a stimulus previously associated with pain is present
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This effect has been labeled conditioned suppression or a conditioned emotional response.
A notable line of research that grew out of the conditioned suppression paradigm was that of Rescorla (e.g., Rescorla and LoLordo 1965; Rescorla and Solomon 1967).
Emotion was also held to play a role in early analyses of a phenomenon closely related to conditioned suppression: avoidance learning.
This study used the Martians task (Arcediano, Ortega, & Matute, 1996), a simple computer game in which Pavlovian associations are assessed through conditioned suppression of an on-going operant behavior.
The present paper investigates the minimal conditions for establishing context conditioning as induced by US-unpredictability in a conditioned suppression preparation i.e.
study (2004) and, arguably expectancy-based conditioned suppression serving as dependent variable in our experiments.
Although initially measured indirectly, through its disruptive effect on operant behavior (conditioned suppression), and later by direct observation, automated techniques of measuring movement have recently become available, which also enable the measurement of conditioned freezing.
This procedure is prone to observational sampling error and has the inherent inaccuracy of assigning one of two states to the response outcome during the sample segments observe& Ah alternative way to measure the freezing response has been through conditioned suppression, that is, through the interruption of operant responding brought about by the presentation of the CS (Estes & Skinner, 1941).
However, studies on conditioned suppression of movement, known as learned nonuse (involving the paretic limb), led to the development of constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy).
Conditioned suppression of immune responses has been shown since 1974, following a serendipitous discovery by a psychologist who was studying how quickly mice can learn to avoid drinking water which is flavored with something associated with nausea- in this case, nausea induced by the drug cyclophosphamide (an anti-cancer agent, which by coincidence is sometimes used to try to arrest progressive MS).
There has been continuing debate as to whether conditioned suppression (Estes & Skinner, 1941) or discriminated punishment (Geller & Seifter, 1960) are appropriate animal models for the assessment of clinical anxiolytics and related compounds.
We examined its utility in a recent series of experiments in which conditioned suppression (of lever pressing by rats) was modified by acute or chronic treatment with an anxiolytic (chlordiazepoxide) or an anticonvulsant that acts at the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex (valproate), or by one of these drugs in combination with a possible antagonist.