conditioned suppression

conditioned suppression

n
(Psychology) psychol the reduction in the frequency of a learned response, e.g. pressing a bar for water, that occurs when a stimulus previously associated with pain is present
References in periodicals archive ?
This effect has been labeled conditioned suppression or a conditioned emotional response.
A notable line of research that grew out of the conditioned suppression paradigm was that of Rescorla (e.
213-217) argued that emotions are special incidences of operant-respondent interactions and cited a number of studies from the conditioned suppression literature described above to illustrate how responding productive of food reinforcement is affected by the presentation of Pavlovian CSs.
This study used the Martians task (Arcediano, Ortega, & Matute, 1996), a simple computer game in which Pavlovian associations are assessed through conditioned suppression of an on-going operant behavior.
The present paper investigates the minimal conditions for establishing context conditioning as induced by US-unpredictability in a conditioned suppression preparation i.
study (2004) and, arguably expectancy-based conditioned suppression serving as dependent variable in our experiments.
Although freezing is sufficient to bring about conditioned suppression, it is not necessary for its occurrence: under certain conditions, such as lesions to the periaqueductal gray (Amorapanth, Nader & LeDoux, 1999), conditioned suppression can occur in the absence of freezing.
Lesions of periaqueductal gray dissociate-conditioned freezing from conditioned suppression behavior in rats.
Conditioned suppression of immune responses has been shown since 1974, following a serendipitous discovery by a psychologist who was studying how quickly mice can learn to avoid drinking water which is flavored with something associated with nausea- in this case, nausea induced by the drug cyclophosphamide (an anti-cancer agent, which by coincidence is sometimes used to try to arrest progressive MS).
There has been continuing debate as to whether conditioned suppression (Estes & Skinner, 1941) or discriminated punishment (Geller & Seifter, 1960) are appropriate animal models for the assessment of clinical anxiolytics and related compounds.
We examined its utility in a recent series of experiments in which conditioned suppression (of lever pressing by rats) was modified by acute or chronic treatment with an anxiolytic (chlordiazepoxide) or an anticonvulsant that acts at the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex (valproate), or by one of these drugs in combination with a possible antagonist.
We sought to establish the similarity of action for a barbiturate to that of benzodiazepines for our conditioned suppression paradigm and to identify the pattern of interaction with putative antagonists.