conditioning


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con·di·tion·ing

 (kən-dĭsh′ə-nĭng)
n.
1. A process of behavior modification by which a subject comes to associate a desired behavior with a previously unrelated stimulus.
2.
a. The process of training that results in physical fitness.
b. The state of physical fitness that results from such training.

conditioning

(kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ)
n
(Psychology) psychol the learning process by which the behaviour of an organism becomes dependent on an event occurring in its environment. See also classical conditioning, instrumental learning
adj
(Hairdressing & Grooming) (of a shampoo, cosmetic, etc) intended to improve the condition of something: a conditioning rinse.

con•di•tion•ing

(kənˈdɪʃ ə nɪŋ)

n.
1. a process of changing behavior by rewarding or punishing a subject each time an action is performed.
2. Also called classical conditioning. a process in which a previously neutral stimulus comes to evoke a specific response by being repeatedly paired with another stimulus that evokes the response.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
learning, acquisition - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge; "the child's acquisition of language"
experimental extinction, extinction - a conditioning process in which the reinforcer is removed and a conditioned response becomes independent of the conditioned stimulus
aversive conditioning - conditioning to avoid an aversive stimulus
classical conditioning - conditioning that pairs a neutral stimulus with a stimulus that evokes a reflex; the stimulus that evokes the reflex is given whether or not the conditioned response occurs until eventually the neutral stimulus comes to evoke the reflex
operant conditioning - conditioning in which an operant response is brought under stimulus control by virtue of presenting reinforcement contingent upon the occurrence of the operant response
counter conditioning - conditioning in which a second incompatible response is conditioned to an already conditioned stimulus; "counter conditioning lies behind many of the procedures used in behavior therapy"

conditioning

noun training, education, teaching, accustoming, habituation Because of social conditioning, men don't expect to be managed by women.
Translations

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ]
A. ADJ conditioning shampoochampú m acondicionador
B. N (social) → condicionamiento m
see also air B

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ] n
[person] → conditionnement m
[hair] → traitement m

conditioning

[kənˈdɪʃənɪŋ] ncondizionamento

con·di·tion·ing

n. acondicionamiento, condicionamiento.

conditioning

n acondicionamiento; physical — acondicionamiento físico
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines and Rest of South Asia among which India is expected to witness significant growth in fuel conditioning system market over the forecast period.
The strength and conditioning profession has certainly burgeoned over the past 30 years in both supply and demand.
Currently, Local Law 11/98 does require comment of the current condition of presently existing air conditioning units and window guards.
A more durable LI effect was observed in the low-intensity condition than in the high-intensity condition during conditioning trials.
While there have been many improvements in sand conditioning practices to achieve this feel, tests designed to determine ideal sand characteristics remain subjective, causing foundries to rely somewhat on guesswork.
psychologist John Watson and his assistant Rosalie Rayner used Pavlovian-style conditioning to instill fear in a baby named Albert.
Young dancers are adopting conditioning and strength maintenance regimens to prepare themselves for today's physically demanding choreography.
Other theories of causation of MCS include more complex biologic mechanisms for the conditioning model described above, relying upon interaction between the olfactory, nervous, and endocrine systems to explain odor-triggered symptoms (17,31).
Law enforcement agencies that understand the human reluctance to kill and the effects of conditioning can develop training programs that will allow their officers, first, to successfully and appropriately employ deadly force and, second, to survive the emotional and psychological aftereffects of deadly force incidents.