condyle


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Related to condyle: mandibular condyle
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condyle
posterior view of a
right knee joint

con·dyle

 (kŏn′dīl′, -dl)
n.
A rounded prominence at the end of a bone, most often for articulation with another bone.

[Latin condylus, knuckle, from Greek kondulos.]

con′dy·lar (-də-lər) adj.
con′dy·loid′ (-dl-oid′) adj.

condyle

(ˈkɒndɪl)
n
(Anatomy) the rounded projection on the articulating end of a bone, such as the ball portion of a ball-and-socket joint
[C17: from Latin condylus knuckle, joint, from Greek kondulos]
ˈcondylar adj

con•dyle

(ˈkɒn daɪl, -dl)

n.
1. the rounded process at the end of a bone, forming part of a joint.
2. (in arthropods) a similar process formed from the hard integument.
[1625–35; < New Latin condylus knuckle < Greek kóndylos]
con′dy•lar, adj.
con′dy•loid`, adj.

con·dyle

(kŏn′dīl′)
A rounded prominence at the end of a bone.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.condyle - a round bump on a bone where it forms a joint with another bonecondyle - a round bump on a bone where it forms a joint with another bone
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
condylar process, condyloid process, mandibular condyle - the condyle of the ramus of the mandible that articulates with the skull
lateral condyle - a condyle on the outer side of the lower extremity of the femur
medial condyle - a condyle on the inner side of the lower extremity of the femur
Translations
condylus

con·dyle

n. cóndilo, porción redondeada de un hueso, usualmente en la articulación.

condyle

n cóndilo
References in periodicals archive ?
Anterior cruciate ligament injury was found to be positively associated with medial femoral condyle contusion and medial tibial plateau contusion and negatively associated with lateral tibial plateau contusion and lateral meniscus injury (Table 3) (Figures 1-4).
from the right lateral condyle, right intercondylar area, right medial condyle, left medial condyle, left intercondylar area and left lateral condyle (Fig.
The knee MR images were examined in terms of the BC volume, joint effusion level, medial plica presence, cartilage degeneration in the medial femoral condyle (MFC), medial tibial condyle (MTC), lateral femoral condyle (LFC), and lateral tibial condyle (LTC), and rupture presence in the medial meniscus anterior horn (MMAH), medial meniscus posterior horn (MMPH), lateral meniscus anterior horn (LMAH), and lateral meniscus posterior horn (LMPB).
Following the completion of the ORIF, severe intraoperative bleeding was encountered from the posterior medial aspect of the condyle. All local measures of packing failed to arrest the bleeding, and the patient underwent emergency angiography to identify and treat the possible source of bleeding, which was anticipated to be from the right internal maxillary artery.
A normal ACL is characterized by continuous, homogeneous low-signal intensity fibers, extending from the intercondylar notch of the tibial plateau to the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle. The ACL is best visualized with a turbo spin echo (TSE) sagittal intermediate weighted sequence and axial intermediate weighted with fat-suppression sequence.
In this study, CBCT data and the fractal analysis method were used to evaluate and compare the trabecular bone structure changes in condyle heads of patients in the RA group with those of the control group.
Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK) was first reported in 1968 by Ahlback.[1] It was defined as a distinct clinical entity with characteristic findings including a subchondral lesion in the weight-bearing region of a single condyle. The exact etiology of SONK is not clear.[2] Evidence suggests that chronic stress, insufficient blood supply, or minor trauma may result in a weakened subchondral bone plate, which could present as subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee or focal subchondral osteonecrosis.[3] SONK is prevalent in middle-aged women (usually >55 years old, male: female ratio approximately 1: 3).[3] Its main symptom is acute pain in the involved knee, which is often confined to the medial knee.
The region of the basioccipital bone protects the conspicuous occipital condyle (Condylus occipitalis--CO, Figures.
Fractures of lateral tibial condyle treated by skeletal traction and early mobilization: a review of sixty cases with special reference to the long-term results.
Presence of unerupted mandibular third molar concentrates the stress in angle region leading to its fracture while, in absence of unerupted third molar, forces are diverted towards condyle making it more vulnerable to injury.