confessionalist

confessionalist

(kənˈfɛʃənəlɪst)
n
an advocate of confessionalism
References in periodicals archive ?
John, whose The Last Troubadour: New and Selected Poems was published last year, as quintessentially a confessionalist. Yet his poems are tied, like a ribbon, to an expressionism most confessionalists avoid.
I think also inter alia of the early confessionalist protagonists for religious toleration; of common reliance of the Benedictines and Methodism's John Wesley's on the spiritual discipline of John Cassian; the Anglo-Catholic relations arising from Newman and the Oxford Movement; the Protestant admirations for St Francis (if often out of touch with mediaeval Catholic, starting with Paul Sabatier).
Anselm Min has proposed six types represented by its corresponding advocates: (1) "phenomenalist" (John Hick and Paul Knitter); (z) "universalist" (Leonard Swidler, Wilfred Cantwell Smith, Ninian Smart, Keith Ward, and David Krieger); (3) "ethical or soteriological pluralism" (Rosemary Ruether, Marjorie Suchocki, Tom Driver, and Paul Knitter; (4) "confessionalist" (Hans Kiing, John Cobb, Jurgen Moltmann, John Milbank, and S.
As pro-Syrian elements mounted a sustained media campaign to suggest that Hariri was a corrupt confessionalist in the winter of 2005, the former prime minister was eager to stand his political ground, Sabaa testified Tuesday.
To demonstrate Lowell's dialogic imagination, and to disprove the "confessionalist" moniker, Bidart paid special attention to the poem "To Speak of Woe That Is in Marriage." As the notes to the poem in the Collected Poems, edited by Bidart and David Gewanter, point out, "To Speak of Woe" is itself deeply in conversation with literary and philosophical traditions.
Hodge and Gerhart suggested that the German theological tradition was one of "mediating theology," a movement emerging out of the eighteenth-century Pietism that asserted Christianity was "not doctrine, but life." This mediating approach, blossoming in nineteenth-century German theological faculties, offered both a welcome approach to culture and an incentive for seeking a positive relationship with "modern science." And especially in light of that latter commitment to abetting a conversation between Christian theology and nineteenth-century science, the mediating theologians of Germany were clearly distinguished from "confessionalist" thinkers seeking to shore up the fortress of orthodoxy against the onslaught of modernity.
In taking this approach, Winter readily admits his debt to the works of Ahmad Beydoun and Kamal Salibi, who almost a quarter century ago, have questioned and criticized Lebanese national historiography for its 'confessionalist' premises.
Ironically, Mennonites and Hutterites turned to spiritualist histories, such as Franck's Chronica, as historical ammunition in their confessionalist debates with spiritualist adversaries.
He clearly demarcates his theological effort from that of fellow Methodist Stanley Hauerwas, whose work, in Neville's eyes, is too confessionalist and parochial to really address or appropriate contemporary challenges to theology.
The confessionalist writes about experiences of inner and twentieth-century turmoil that are far removed from the scholastic concerns of the Angelic Doctor.
The fairness discretion would then focus on cases where the conduct which induces the making of a voluntary confession throws doubt on its reliability and thereby establishes the unfairness of using the confession against the confessionalist on his trial.
With much subtlety and erudition, Canavan convincingly argues that "what the Church actually changed in DH was the concept of the state on which the previous confessionalist doctrine was based, not its own authority or the duty of its members to uphold and defend that authority" (69).