confidant


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

confidant

a friend to whom secrets are confided (fem. confidante)
Not to be confused with:
confident – having strong belief; sure; certain; self-assured
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

con·fi·dant

 (kŏn′fĭ-dănt′, -dänt′, kŏn′fĭ-dănt′, -dänt′)
n.
1. One to whom secrets or private matters are disclosed.
2. A character in a drama or fiction, such as a trusted friend or servant, who serves as a device for revealing the inner thoughts or intentions of a main character.

[French confident, from Italian confidente, from Latin cōnfīdēns, cōnfīdent-, present participle of cōnfīdere, to rely on; see confide.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

confidant

(ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt; ˈkɒnfɪˌdænt)
n
a person, esp a man, to whom private matters are confided
[C17: from French confident, from Italian confidente, n use of adj: trustworthy, from Latin confīdens confident]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•fi•dant

(ˈkɒn fɪˌdænt, -ˌdɑnt, -dənt, ˌkɒn fɪˈdænt, -ˈdɑnt)

n.
a person to whom secrets are confided or with whom private matters and problems are discussed.
[1705–15; < French confident < Italian confidente, n. use of adj.; see confident]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

confidant

confident
1. 'confidant'

Confidant /'kɒnfɪdænt/ is a noun. A confidant is a person who you discuss your private problems and worries with. You use the spelling confidante when the person is a woman.

...Colonel House, a friend and confidant of President Woodrow Wilson.
She became her father's only confidante.
2. 'confident'

Confident /'kɒnfɪdənt/ is an adjective. If you are confident about something, you are certain that it will happen in the way you want.

He was confident that the problem with the guidance mechanism could be fixed.
I feel confident about the future of British music.

People who are confident are sure of their own abilities.

... a witty, young and confident lawyer.
His manner is more confident these days.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confidant - someone to whom private matters are confidedconfidant - someone to whom private matters are confided
confidante - a female confidant
friend - a person you know well and regard with affection and trust; "he was my best friend at the university"
repository, secretary - a person to whom a secret is entrusted
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

confidant

confidante
noun close friend, familiar, intimate, crony, alter ego, main man (slang, chiefly U.S.), bosom friend You are her closest friend and confidante.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

confidant

noun
1. One in whom secrets are confided:
2. A person whom one knows well, likes, and trusts:
Informal: bud, buddy.
Slang: sidekick.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] Nconfidente m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] nconfident m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

confidant

nVertraute(r) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] nconfidente m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
TO THE COMPANION OF MY IDLE HOURS, THE SOOTHER OF MY SORROWS, THE CONFIDANT OF MY JOYS AND HOPES--
Here of course was the very heaven-sent confidant for such an enterprise as mine.
There is nothing sacred from reverence, and love's lovers have a right to regard themselves as the confidants of lovers, whenever they may chance to surprise either them or their letters.
The prince's further fate was more or less decided by Colia, who selected, out of all the persons he had met during the last six or seven months, Evgenie Pavlovitch, as friend and confidant. To him he made over all that he knew as to the events above recorded, and as to the present condition of the prince.
"Well, I've left two stories with a newspaperman, and he's to give his answer next week," whispered Jo, in her confidant's ear.
He was a great confidant of Long John Silver, and so the mention of his name leads me on to speak of our ship's cook, Barbecue, as the men called him.
Fix made up his mind that, if worst came to worst, he would make a confidant of Passepartout, and tell him what kind of a fellow his master really was.
He had not a single confidant, even his cashier had no idea whence came the large sums of money which he had paid away right and left.
Valentine, will you permit me to make a confidant of a friend and reveal to him the love I bear you?"
"And what of him?" cried Roger Chillingworth, eagerly, as if he loved the topic, and were glad of an opportunity to discuss it with the only person of whom he could make a confidant. "Not to hide the truth, Mistress Hester, my thoughts happen just now to be busy with the gentleman.
He had been raised by circumstances to the rank of a confidant to his master.
Crawford with either sister without observation, and seldom without wonder or censure; and had her confidence in her own judgment been equal to her exercise of it in every other respect, had she been sure that she was seeing clearly, and judging candidly, she would probably have made some important communications to her usual confidant. As it was, however, she only hazarded a hint, and the hint was lost.