confidant

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con·fi·dant

 (kŏn′fĭ-dănt′, -dänt′, kŏn′fĭ-dănt′, -dänt′)
n.
1. One to whom secrets or private matters are disclosed.
2. A character in a drama or fiction, such as a trusted friend or servant, who serves as a device for revealing the inner thoughts or intentions of a main character.

[French confident, from Italian confidente, from Latin cōnfīdēns, cōnfīdent-, present participle of cōnfīdere, to rely on; see confide.]

confidant

(ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt; ˈkɒnfɪˌdænt)
n
a person, esp a man, to whom private matters are confided
[C17: from French confident, from Italian confidente, n use of adj: trustworthy, from Latin confīdens confident]

con•fi•dant

(ˈkɒn fɪˌdænt, -ˌdɑnt, -dənt, ˌkɒn fɪˈdænt, -ˈdɑnt)

n.
a person to whom secrets are confided or with whom private matters and problems are discussed.
[1705–15; < French confident < Italian confidente, n. use of adj.; see confident]

confidant

confident
1. 'confidant'

Confidant /'kɒnfɪdænt/ is a noun. A confidant is a person who you discuss your private problems and worries with. You use the spelling confidante when the person is a woman.

...Colonel House, a friend and confidant of President Woodrow Wilson.
She became her father's only confidante.
2. 'confident'

Confident /'kɒnfɪdənt/ is an adjective. If you are confident about something, you are certain that it will happen in the way you want.

He was confident that the problem with the guidance mechanism could be fixed.
I feel confident about the future of British music.

People who are confident are sure of their own abilities.

... a witty, young and confident lawyer.
His manner is more confident these days.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confidant - someone to whom private matters are confidedconfidant - someone to whom private matters are confided
confidante - a female confidant
friend - a person you know well and regard with affection and trust; "he was my best friend at the university"
repository, secretary - a person to whom a secret is entrusted

confidant

confidante
noun close friend, familiar, intimate, crony, alter ego, main man (slang, chiefly U.S.), bosom friend You are her closest friend and confidante.

confidant

noun
1. One in whom secrets are confided:
2. A person whom one knows well, likes, and trusts:
Informal: bud, buddy.
Slang: sidekick.
Translations

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] Nconfidente m

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] nconfident m

confidant

nVertraute(r) m

confidant

[ˌkɒnfɪˈdænt] nconfidente m
References in classic literature ?
There is nothing sacred from reverence, and love's lovers have a right to regard themselves as the confidants of lovers, whenever they may chance to surprise either them or their letters.
Anne of Austria, deprived of the confidence of her husband, pursued by the hatred of the cardinal, who could not pardon her for having repulsed a more tender feeling, having before her eyes the example of the queen-mother whom that hatred had tormented all her life--though Marie de Medicis, if the memoirs of the time are to be believed, had begun by according to the cardinal that sentiment which Anne of Austria always refused him--Anne of Austria had seen her most devoted servants fall around her, her most intimate confidants, her dearest favorites.
To her friend and confidants no word save of pride and love for her husband had ever passed her lips, yet now as she watched her daughter she was conscious of a wild, passionate wish that her fate at least might be a different one.
Well then; he was mixed up in the affairs of La Vendee, and he was one of the confidants of the late King.
Mahtoree was not long in communicating his plans to his confidants, whom he as quickly dismissed to join their fellows in the rear.
Ferrars, and the kind of confidant of himself, talked to her a great deal of the parsonage at Delaford, described its deficiencies, and told her what he meant to do himself towards removing them.
Know, that in the course of your future life you will often find yourself elected the involuntary confidant of your acquaintances' secrets: people will instinctively find out, as I have done, that it is not your forte to tell of yourself, but to listen while others talk of themselves; they will feel, too, that you listen with no malevolent scorn of their indiscretion, but with a kind of innate sympathy; not the less comforting and encouraging because it is very unobtrusive in its manifestations.
He was a great confidant of Long John Silver, and so the mention of his name leads me on to speak of our ship's cook, Barbecue, as the men called him.
Fix made up his mind that, if worst came to worst, he would make a confidant of Passepartout, and tell him what kind of a fellow his master really was.
Valentine, will you permit me to make a confidant of a friend and reveal to him the love I bear you?
He was afraid to make an open declaration of his concern, because he dreaded to place some unscrupulous confidant upon the high plane of the unconfessed from which elevation he could be derided.
I never meddle in intrigues, and if I occasionally become a confidant of the intrigues of others I am sure your eminence will approve of my keeping them secret.