confider


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con·fide

 (kən-fīd′)
v. con·fid·ed, con·fid·ing, con·fides
v.tr.
1. To tell (something) in confidence: confided a secret to his friend.
2. To give as a responsibility or put into another's care: confided the task of drafting the report to her assistant.
v.intr.
To disclose private matters in confidence: He knew he could confide in his parents.

[Middle English, to rely on, from Old French confider, from Latin cōnfīdere : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + fīdere, to trust; see bheidh- in Indo-European roots.]

con·fid′er n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The main goal of this study is to confider the SAP1-3 gene experission in iranian patients based on the site of candidal infection.
To the Private Soldier: "As a private soldier you fhouid confider all your officers as your natural enemies, with whom you are in a perpetual ftate of warfare: you fhouid reflect that they are constantly endeavouring to withhold from you ali your juft dues, and to impose on you every unneceffary hardship; and this for the mere fatisfaction of doing you an injury.
In these other professions, the "obligation of confidence attaches to a confidant only in respect of confidential information disclosed to him by the confider." (65) However in the banking context, the banker is in a different position, one analogous to "an employee who will be bound to respect the confidentiality of information which he acquires in his capacity qua employee, even though this information is not directly derived from their employer." (66) In this sense then, one could argue that even though the banker's duty flows from the law of confidential communications, it forms a distinct branch of this area of law with its own particular mode of analysis that is consistent with the particular circumstances of the banker-customer relationship.
Confider X = R endowed with the natural metric and K = [1, [infinity]).
We will recompense the confider for a breach only if: