configuration

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con·fig·u·ra·tion

 (kən-fĭg′yə-rā′shən)
n.
The arrangement of parts or elements in a pattern or form, as:
a. Chemistry The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule.
b. Computers The way in which a computer system or network is set up or connected.
c. Psychology Gestalt.

con·fig′u·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
con·fig′u·ra′tive, con·fig′u·ra′tion·al adj.

configuration

(kənˌfɪɡjʊˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the arrangement of the parts of something
2. the external form or outline achieved by such an arrangement
3. (Chemistry) physics chem
a. Also called: conformation the shape of a molecule as determined by the arrangement of its atoms
b. the structure of an atom or molecule as determined by the arrangement of its electrons and nucleons
4. (General Physics) physics chem
a. Also called: conformation the shape of a molecule as determined by the arrangement of its atoms
b. the structure of an atom or molecule as determined by the arrangement of its electrons and nucleons
5. (Psychology) psychol the unit or pattern in perception studied by Gestalt psychologists
6. (Computer Science) computing the particular choice of hardware items and their interconnection that make up a particular computer system
[C16: from Late Latin configūrātiō a similar formation, from configūrāre to model on something, from figūrāre to shape, fashion]
conˌfiguˈrational, conˈfigurative adj
conˌfiguˈrationally adv

con•fig•u•ra•tion

(kənˌfɪg yəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the relative disposition or arrangement of the parts or elements of a thing.
2. external form, as resulting from this.
3. an atomic spatial arrangement that is fixed by the chemical bonding in a molecule and that cannot be altered without breaking bonds (contrasted with conformation).
4.
a. a computer plus the equipment connected to it.
b. the act of configuring a computer system.
[1550–60; < Late Latin configūrātiō comparison <configūrā(re) to compare (Latin: to mold; see con-, figure)]
con•fig`u•ra′tion•al, con•fig′u•ra•tive (-yər ə tɪv, -yəˌreɪ tɪv) adj.

Configuration

 a pattern of stars, of muscles, etc.; a particular form of organization of a number of separate elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.configuration - an arrangement of parts or elementsconfiguration - an arrangement of parts or elements; "the outcome depends on the configuration of influences at the time"
design, plan - an arrangement scheme; "the awkward design of the keyboard made operation difficult"; "it was an excellent design for living"; "a plan for seating guests"
redundancy - (electronics) a system design that duplicates components to provide alternatives in case one component fails
network topology, topology - the configuration of a communication network
chunking, unitisation, unitization - (psychology) the configuration of smaller units of information into large coordinated units
2.configuration - any spatial attributes (especially as defined by outline)configuration - any spatial attributes (especially as defined by outline); "he could barely make out their shapes"
keenness, sharpness - thinness of edge or fineness of point
bluntness, dullness - without sharpness or clearness of edge or point; "the dullness of the pencil made his writing illegible"
spatial property, spatiality - any property relating to or occupying space
topography - the configuration of a surface and the relations among its man-made and natural features
lobularity - the property of having lobules
concaveness, concavity - the property possessed by a concave shape
convexity, convexness - the property possessed by a convex shape
angularity - the property possessed by a shape that has angles
narrowing - an instance of becoming narrow
curvature, curve - the property possessed by the curving of a line or surface
roundness - the property possessed by a line or surface that is curved and not angular
straightness - freedom from crooks or curves or bends or angles
crookedness - having or distinguished by crooks or curves or bends or angles
stratification - a layered configuration

configuration

noun arrangement, form, shape, cast, outline, contour, conformation, figure The flow of water follows the configuration of the rock strata.

configuration

noun
The external outline of a thing:
Translations
konfigurace
asetus

configuration

[kənˌfɪgjʊˈreɪʃən] N (gen) (Comput) → configuración f

configuration

[kənˌfɪgʊˈreɪʃən] n
(= arrangement) → configuration f
(COMPUTING)configuration f

configuration

nKonfiguration f (form); (Geog) → Form f, → Gestalt f; (Sci) → Struktur f, → Aufbau m; (Astron) → Anordnung f, → Aspekt m (spec); (Comput) → Konfiguration f

configuration

[kənˌfigjʊˈreɪʃn] n (Comput) → configurazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, he envisioned political science "to take the lead in a configurative approach to the decision process in society" (Lasswell 1956:979).
Electronic auction: purchase of configurative household items for objects of material and technical basis (237 pcs.
What is usually acknowledged in scholarly studies of this period is that the formal end of Spanish colonialism overseas marked the beginning of a configurative process of Spanish nationalisation, and that this process in no small measure continued associating the idea of "Spain" to an imperial consciousness, an association that had already been securely forged in nineteenth-century Spanish historiography (18).
26) Heidegger confirms this as follows: "The configurative forces collide," "Circle is the sign of the ring that wrings back to itself' (Ibid.
She offers a configurative approach, investigating conceptual clusters, the metaphor of the body surface as limit or wall, the phantasm of flaying, the utopian fantasy of transcending the skin, theepidermis as a legible screen, and the body and its parts as bearers of ethnic information, colour traces, or stigmata, the curator of the gallery further explained.
Analyzing the visual scheme produced on the task sheet and generating a configurative interpretation whose aim is to highlight a central idea emergent from the variety of texts.
The second half of the book focuses on 'ludology', the study of games, beginning with an overview of the most relevant definitions of games, game ontology, rules and configurative practices, and game time (Chapters 13 to 17), and the application of ludological thinking to the role of players, transmediality and the configurative nature of games (Chapters 18 to 20).
Subjective well-being and meaning in life in a hostile world: Proposing a configurative perspective.
In figure 6, the beds point of view has changed from one sketch to the other, now acknowledged as a visual change of perspective and not as a configurative change of perspective like it was in experiment 1.
This game is a clear exploitation of the basics of procedural rhetoric: it gives the user configurative control over a scenario in which she must learn the effects of her action while working within the rules to attain a goal.