confined

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con·fine

 (kən-fīn′)
tr.v. con·fined, con·fin·ing, con·fines
1. To keep within bounds; restrict: Please confine your remarks to the issues at hand. See Synonyms at limit.
2. To shut or keep in, especially to imprison.
3. To restrict in movement: The sick child was confined to bed.

[French confiner, from Old French, from confins, boundaries; see confines.]

con·fin′a·ble, con·fine′a·ble adj.
con·fin′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

confined

(kənˈfaɪnd)
adj
1. enclosed or restricted; limited
2. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) in childbed; undergoing childbirth
confinedly adv
conˈfinedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•fined

(kənˈfaɪnd)

adj.
1. limited or restricted.
2. kept from leaving a place by illness, imprisonment, etc.
3. being in childbirth; being in parturition.
con•fin′ed•ly, adv.
con•fin′ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.confined - not invading healthy tissue
invasive - marked by a tendency to spread especially into healthy tissue; "invasive cancer cells"
2.confined - not free to move about
unfree - hampered and not free; not able to act at will
restricted - subject to restriction or subjected to restriction; "of restricted importance"
unconfined - not confined
3.confined - being in captivity
unfree - hampered and not free; not able to act at will
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

confined

adjective restricted, small, limited, narrow, enclosed, cramped His long legs were cramped in the confined space.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
ضَيِّق، صَغيرمَحْصورٌ ، مَحْجوز في
omezenýstísněnýupoutaný
begrænsetbegrænset tilbundet tilsnæver
ágy: ágyhoz kötötten
òröngur, lítillrúmfastur
upútaný
…-e bağlı kalmışküçük

confined

[kənˈfaɪnd] ADJreducido
a confined spaceun espacio reducido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

confined

[kənˈfaɪnd] adj [space] → restreint(e), réduit(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

confined

adj spacebeschränkt, begrenzt; atmospherebeengend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

confined

[kənˈfaɪnd] adj (space) → ristretto/a
a confined space → uno spazio ristretto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

confine

(kənˈfain) verb
1. to keep within limits; to stop from spreading. They succeeded in confining the fire to a small area.
2. to shut up or imprison. The prince was confined in the castle for three years.
conˈfined adjective
1. (with to) kept in or shut up in. confined to bed with a cold.
2. narrow, small. a confined space.
conˈfinement noun
1. state of being shut up or imprisoned. solitary confinement.
2. (the time of) the birth of a child. her third confinement.
ˈconfines (ˈkon-) noun plural
limits or boundaries. within the confines of the city.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

confined

a. recluido-a, confinado-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Importance of preliminary (before using the genetic test) differentiation and identification of the species Armillaria in the field can be connected with necessity for receiving source information on occurrence and confinedness of separate species in certain regions, depending on type and tempo of natural resources exploitation.
Miranda Sawyer argues in New Statesman that changing this characteristic of the original forfeits "the first film's creepy confinedness, the sense of everyone and everything toppling down" (45), but while this "toppling down" is key to the Mackendrick version's social commentary, the Coen brothers' remake floats the suggestion that Marva Munson might be working from a stable position within an implicitly stable society.