confines


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con·fines

 (kŏn′fīnz′)
pl.n.
1. The limits of a space or area; the borders: within the confines of one county.
2. Restraining elements: wanted to escape the confines of corporate politics.
3. Purview; scope: a theory that is well within the confines of science.

[Old French confins, boundaries, from Latin cōnfīnia, pl. of cōnfīnium, boundary, from cōnfīnis, adjoining : com-, com- + fīnis, border.]

confines

(ˈkɒnfaɪnz)
pl n
limits; boundaries
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confines - a bounded scope; "he stayed within the confines of the city"
ambit, range, scope, reach, compass, orbit - an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control: "the range of a supersonic jet"; "a piano has a greater range than the human voice"; "the ambit of municipal legislation"; "within the compass of this article"; "within the scope of an investigation"; "outside the reach of the law"; "in the political orbit of a world power"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
حَدود
hranicepomezí
grænseramme
határok
mörk
hranice
hudutlarsınırlar

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] NPLconfines mpl, límites mpl

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] nplconfins mpl, limites fpl
within the confines of → dans les limites de

confines

[ˈkɒnfaɪnz] npl (bounds) → confini mpl

confine

(kənˈfain) verb
1. to keep within limits; to stop from spreading. They succeeded in confining the fire to a small area.
2. to shut up or imprison. The prince was confined in the castle for three years.
conˈfined adjective
1. (with to) kept in or shut up in. confined to bed with a cold.
2. narrow, small. a confined space.
conˈfinement noun
1. state of being shut up or imprisoned. solitary confinement.
2. (the time of) the birth of a child. her third confinement.
ˈconfines (ˈkon-) noun plural
limits or boundaries. within the confines of the city.
References in classic literature ?
But if the area be large, its several districts will almost certainly present different conditions of life; and then if natural selection be modifying and improving a species in the several districts, there will be intercrossing with the other individuals of the same species on the confines of each.
Creon desires to bury Oedipus on the confines of Thebes so as to avoid the pollution and yet offer due rites at his tomb.
And, more surprising still, a high screen with folding sides stands before the fire, and confines the light which it might otherwise give exclusively to the ceiling.
I do not pretend to plead the immunities of my order so highly as this; but neither will I allow that the author of a modern antique romance is obliged to confine himself to the introduction of those manners only which can be proved to have absolutely existed in the times he is depicting, so that he restrain himself to such as are plausible and natural, and contain no obvious anachronism.
As for elves and fairies, and other such mummery, I purposely omit the mention of them, as I should be very unwilling to confine within any bounds those surprizing imaginations, for whose vast capacity the limits of human nature are too narrow; whose works are to be considered as a new creation; and who have consequently just right to do what they will with their own.
They differ, again, in their length: for Tragedy endeavours, as far as possible, to confine itself to a single revolution of the sun, or but slightly to exceed this limit; whereas the Epic action has no limits of time.
As a very distinguished flirt I have always been taught to consider her, but it has lately fallen In my way to hear some particulars of her conduct at Langford: which prove that she does not confine herself to that sort of honest flirtation which satisfies most people, but aspires to the more delicious gratification of making a whole family miserable.