conflate

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con·flate

 (kən-flāt′)
tr.v. con·flat·ed, con·flat·ing, con·flates
1. To bring together; meld or fuse: "The problems [with the biopic] include ... dates moved around, lovers deleted, many characters conflated into one" (Ty Burr).
2. To combine (two variant texts, for example) into one whole.
3. To fail to distinguish between; confuse. See Usage Note below.

[Latin cōnflāre, cōnflāt- : com-, com- + flāre, to blow; see bhlē- in Indo-European roots.]

con·fla′tion n.
Usage Note: Traditionally, conflate means "To bring together; meld or fuse," as in the sentence I have trouble differentiating Jane Austen's heroines; I realized I had conflated Elizabeth Bennet and Emma Woodhouse into a single character in my mind. In our 2015 survey, 87 percent of the Usage Panelists accepted this traditional usage. Recently, a new sense for conflate has emerged, meaning "To mistake one thing for another," as if it were a synonym for confuse. In 2015, our usage panelists found this new sense to be marginally acceptable, with 55 percent accepting the sentence People often conflate the national debt with the federal deficit; when the senator talked about reducing the debt, he was actually referring to the deficit.

conflate

(kənˈfleɪt)
vb
(tr) to combine or blend (two things, esp two versions of a text) so as to form a whole
[C16: from Latin conflāre to blow together, from flāre to blow]
conˈflation n

con•flate

(kənˈfleɪt)

v.t. -flat•ed, -flat•ing.
to fuse into one entity; merge; combine.
[1600–10; < Latin conflāre to blow on, melt down]

conflate


Past participle: conflated
Gerund: conflating

Imperative
conflate
conflate
Present
I conflate
you conflate
he/she/it conflates
we conflate
you conflate
they conflate
Preterite
I conflated
you conflated
he/she/it conflated
we conflated
you conflated
they conflated
Present Continuous
I am conflating
you are conflating
he/she/it is conflating
we are conflating
you are conflating
they are conflating
Present Perfect
I have conflated
you have conflated
he/she/it has conflated
we have conflated
you have conflated
they have conflated
Past Continuous
I was conflating
you were conflating
he/she/it was conflating
we were conflating
you were conflating
they were conflating
Past Perfect
I had conflated
you had conflated
he/she/it had conflated
we had conflated
you had conflated
they had conflated
Future
I will conflate
you will conflate
he/she/it will conflate
we will conflate
you will conflate
they will conflate
Future Perfect
I will have conflated
you will have conflated
he/she/it will have conflated
we will have conflated
you will have conflated
they will have conflated
Future Continuous
I will be conflating
you will be conflating
he/she/it will be conflating
we will be conflating
you will be conflating
they will be conflating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conflating
you have been conflating
he/she/it has been conflating
we have been conflating
you have been conflating
they have been conflating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conflating
you will have been conflating
he/she/it will have been conflating
we will have been conflating
you will have been conflating
they will have been conflating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conflating
you had been conflating
he/she/it had been conflating
we had been conflating
you had been conflating
they had been conflating
Conditional
I would conflate
you would conflate
he/she/it would conflate
we would conflate
you would conflate
they would conflate
Past Conditional
I would have conflated
you would have conflated
he/she/it would have conflated
we would have conflated
you would have conflated
they would have conflated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.conflate - mix together different elementsconflate - mix together different elements; "The colors blend well"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
gauge - mix in specific proportions; "gauge plaster"
absorb - cause to become one with; "The sales tax is absorbed into the state income tax"
meld, melt - lose its distinct outline or shape; blend gradually; "Hundreds of actors were melting into the scene"
mix in, blend in - cause (something) to be mixed with (something else); "At this stage of making the cake, blend in the nuts"
accrete - grow together (of plants and organs); "After many years the rose bushes grew together"
conjugate - unite chemically so that the product is easily broken down into the original compounds
admix - mix or blend; "Hyaline casts were admixed with neutrophils"
alloy - make an alloy of
syncretise, syncretize - become fused
Translations

conflate

[kənˈfleɪt] VTcombinar

conflate

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