conformist

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con·form·ist

 (kən-fôr′mĭst)
n.
A person who uncritically or habitually conforms to the customs, rules, or styles of a group.
adj.
Marked by conformity or convention: "Underneath the image, teenagers today are surprisingly conformist" (Selina S. Guber).

con·form′ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conformist

(kənˈfɔːmɪst)
n
1. a person who adopts the attitudes, behaviour, dress, etc of the group to which he belongs
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a person who complies with the practices of an established church, esp the Church of England
adj
of a conforming nature or character
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•form•ist

(kənˈfɔr mɪst)

n.
1. a person who conforms, esp. unquestioningly, to the usual practices or standards of a group, society, etc.
2. (often cap.) a person who conforms to the usages of an established church, esp. the Church of England.
adj.
3. of or characterized by conforming, esp. in action or appearance.
[1625–35]
con•form′ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conformist - someone who conforms to established standards of conduct (especially in religious matters)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
conservative, conservativist - a person who is reluctant to accept changes and new ideas
recusant, nonconformist - someone who refuses to conform to established standards of conduct
Adj.1.conformist - marked by convention and conformity to customs or rules or styles; "underneath the radical image teenagers are surprisingly conformist"
nonconformist, unconformist - not conforming to some norm or socially approved pattern of behavior or thought; "their rabidly nonconformist deportment has made them legendary"; "the old stubborn nonconformist spirit of the early settlers"
2.conformist - adhering to established customs or doctrines (especially in religion)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

conformist

noun traditionalist, conservative, reactionary, Babbitt (U.S.), stickler, yes man, stick-in-the-mud (informal), conventionalist He's described as a conformist, an orthodox member of his party.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

conformist

adjective
Conforming to established practice or standards:
Slang: square.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

conformist

[kənˈfɔːmɪst]
A. ADJconformista
B. Nconformista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conformist

[kənˈfɔːrmɪst] n
(gen)conformiste mf
(RELIGION)conformiste mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

conformist

nKonformist m (also Brit Eccl)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

conformist

[kənˈfɔːmɪst]
1. adjconformistico/a
2. nconformista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Globally, experts are at war with understanding and deciphering ways in which the prism can be altered, cut short, so that the image produced can bear more comprehension to the earnest conformists. While the human mind is a web of intricacies, overlapping emotions and augmented realities, the closest people have gone to understanding the non-vandal, non-conformist mind is by deciphering the art that emerges from these minds of unusual depth.
It is the will of the conformists that rules and subjugates the will of the nonconformists, catches it, smashes it and forces it into constraints, ensuring that no one at all can be free or different.
The chapter on religious authority considers first the contempt both reformers and conformists had for the papacy.
A companion to the art exhibition, GULAG: Soviet Forced Labor Camps and the Struggle for Freedom, this volume documents the work of seven contemporary artists representing two generations of non- conformists born during the Stalin and Kruschev eras grappling the history and mythology of the gulags.
Many saw the bishops' authority for subscription and deprivation as contrary to common law, because a clergyman's livelihood was his own property, but conformists countered that argument with the assertion that the historical ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the church was ancient and thus had primacy.
The book thus gives a picture of the intellectual foundations of Jacobean ecclesiology and an account of how those foundations were challenged in the debate between church conformists and their critics.
BM programs, however, are secular exercises in tearing down willful personalities and re-casting them as conformists. Where the approach typified by Father Flanagan and his legendary "Boys Town" is motivated by Christian charity, the motives of many involved in the BM industry are mercenary and ideological.
Much like people, chimpanzees are inveterate conformists whose copycat tendencies enable them to develop cultural traditions, a new study suggests.
In an article in Sweden's Axess Magazine, William Strauss and Nell Howe, generational studies gurus and authors of Millennials Rising, call today's young adults "America's new conformists," observing that they "believe in security rather than radicalism, political order rather than social emancipation, collective responsibility rather than personal expression."
Darrell's exorcisms highlight the process of the creation "of orthodoxy in the Church of England through the struggles between conformists and dissidents" (35).
Wright Mills--were in a state of despair over the condition of our civil society (on the grounds that we had become timid conformists) that was no less severe than Putnam's.