confusedness


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con·fused

 (kən-fyo͞ozd′)
adj.
1. Being unable to think with clarity or act with understanding and intelligence.
2.
a. Lacking logical order or sense: a confused set of rules.
b. Chaotic; jumbled: a confused mass of papers.

con·fus′ed·ly (-fyo͞o′zĭd-lē) adv.
con·fus′ed·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confusedness - a mental state characterized by a lack of clear and orderly thought and behaviorconfusedness - a mental state characterized by a lack of clear and orderly thought and behavior; "a confusion of impressions"
cognitive state, state of mind - the state of a person's cognitive processes
disorientation - confusion (usually transient) about where you are and how to proceed; uncertainty as to direction; "his disorientation was the result of inattention"
distraction - mental turmoil; "he drives me to distraction"
daze, haze, fog - confusion characterized by lack of clarity
half-cock - confusion resulting from lack of preparation
jamais vu - the experience of being unfamiliar with a person or situation that is actually very familiar; associated with certain types of epilepsy
bafflement, befuddlement, bemusement, bewilderment, mystification, obfuscation, puzzlement - confusion resulting from failure to understand
perplexity - trouble or confusion resulting from complexity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

confusedness

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
An eddying murmur filled my ears, and a strange, dumb confusedness descended on my mind.
Names keep changing for sure, but this seems to have been the case in all of Hawthorne's romances--Kenyon's name was settled upon only in chapter 30 of the final draft of The Marble Faun, for instance--and should be seen as another instance of Hawthorne's attention to the symbolic register of his story and not as an indication of confusedness, or even senility, on the author's part.
According to this objection, Leibniz holds that "the necessary confusedness of our perceptions of colors, odors, etc., is ...