alopecia

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Related to congenital alopecia: congenital baldness

al·o·pe·cia

 (ăl′ə-pē′shə, -shē-ə)
n.
Complete or partial loss of hair from the head or other parts of the body.

[Latin alōpecia, fox-mange, from Greek alōpekiā, from alōpēx, alōpek-, fox; see wl̥p-ē- in Indo-European roots.]

al′o·pe′cic (-pē′sĭk) adj.

alopecia

(ˌæləˈpiːʃɪə)
n
(Medicine) loss of hair, esp on the head; baldness
[C14: from Latin, from Greek alōpekia, originally: mange in foxes, from alōpēx fox]

al•o•pe•ci•a

(ˌæl əˈpi ʃi ə, -si ə)

n.
loss of hair; baldness.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek alōpekía mange in foxes =alōpek-, s. of alṓpēx fox + -ia -ia]
al`o•pe′cic (-ˈpi sɪk) adj.

alopecia

1. a loss of hair, feathers, or wool.
2. baldness. — alopecic, adj.
See also: Hair

alopecia

Patchy loss of hair that can be hereditary or caused by disease or stress.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.alopecia - loss of hair (especially on the head) or loss of wool or feathersalopecia - loss of hair (especially on the head) or loss of wool or feathers; in humans it can result from heredity or hormonal imbalance or certain diseases or drugs and treatments (chemotherapy for cancer)
baldness, phalacrosis - the condition of having no hair on the top of the head
alopecia areata - patchy baldness
Translations

alopecia

[ˌæləʊˈpiːʃə] Nalopecia f

al·o·pe·ci·a

n. alopecia, pérdida del cabello.

alopecia

n alopecia
References in periodicals archive ?
In one case, a boy had pervasive intellectual disability, congenital alopecia, and absence of the eyebrows.
5] A variant of monilethrix with scalp erosions and the appearance of congenital alopecia is attributed to a mutation in the gene for desmoglein 4, which can be recessively inherited.
The patients with scarring alopecia, congenital alopecia, hair shaft disorders, abnormal thyroid function tests, any gross (clinically evident) systemic disease, ESR of more than 30mm 1st hour, postmenopausal women, patients who had taken iron, vitamin B12, folic acid or multivitamin supplements for at least 3 months before inclusion in the study, who had pregnancy in the preceding 1 year and patients on anticoagulants, antithyroid drugs, antimitotic drugs, and oral contraceptives were excluded from the study.

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