conglobulation

conglobulation

(kənˌɡlɒbjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
the act of conglobing
References in periodicals archive ?
Together it faced a new phenomenon which was conditioned by the processes of general conglobulation. Firstly, this is cultural and religious pluralism, which more and more becomes a reality in our society.
But it was also a time when (for easy instance) Addison believed in ghosts and John Wesley in witches.(42) Johnson was well aware of the controversy over submersion and migration years before he made his remark about conglobulation. Both of Spector's major contentions are wrong; the conversation with Goldsmith does not prove that Johnson changed his mind, nor was Pennant's book the bombshell that would change it for him.