conjunct


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con·junct

 (kən-jŭngkt′, kŏn′jŭngkt′)
adj.
1. Joined together; united.
2. Acting in association; combined: "the conjunct ... influences of fire and strong drink" (Thomas Love Peacock).
3. Music Of or relating to successive tones of the scale, moving step by step: conjunct motion; a conjunct melody.
n. (kŏn′jŭngkt′)
1. One that is in conjunction or association with another.
2. Logic One of the components of a conjunction.

[Middle English, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin.]

con·junct′ly adv.

conjunct

(kənˈdʒʌŋkt; ˈkɒndʒʌŋkt)
adj
1. joined; united
2. (Music, other) music relating to or denoting two adjacent degrees of a scale
n
(Logic) logic one of the propositions or formulas in a conjunction
[C15: from Latin conjunctus, from conjugere to unite; see conjoin]
conˈjunctly adv

con•junct

(adj. kənˈdʒʌŋkt, ˈkɒn dʒʌŋkt; n. ˈkɒn dʒʌŋkt)

adj.
1. bound in close association; conjoined; united: conjunct influences.
2. formed by conjunction.
3. progressing melodically by intervals of a second: the conjunct motion of an ascending scale.
n.
4. a person or thing conjoined with another.
[1425–75; late Middle English (past participle) < Latin conjunctus, past participle of conjungere to join together; see conjoin]
con•junct′ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.conjunct - progressing melodically by intervals of a second; "conjunct motion of an ascending scale"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
disjunct - progressing melodically by intervals larger than a major second
2.conjunct - bound in close association; "conjunct influences"; "conjunct ideas"
united - characterized by unity; being or joined into a single entity; "presented a united front"
3.conjunct - involving the joint activity of two or more; "concerted action"; "the conjunct influence of fire and strong wind"; "the conjunctive focus of political opposition"; "a cooperative effort"; "a united effort"; "joint military activities"
joint - united or combined; "a joint session of Congress"; "joint owners"
Translations

conjunct

[kənˈdʒʌŋkt] ADJ (Astron) → en conjunción

conjunct

adj (= joined)verbunden; (= combined)vereint, gemeinsam; (Jur) → befangen
References in classic literature ?
And the better those are who are governed the better also is the government, as for instance of man, rather than the brute creation: for the more excellent the materials are with which the work is finished, the more excellent certainly is the work; and wherever there is a governor and a governed, there certainly is some work produced; for whatsoever is composed of many parts, which jointly become one, whether conjunct or separate, evidently show the marks of governing and governed; and this is true of every living thing in all nature; nay, even in some things which partake not of life, as in music; but this probably would be a disquisition too foreign to our present purpose.
According to his horoscope, Modi's 10th lord is moon and it is in debilitated position, conjunct with Mars, which leads to what is known as a Simhasana (Throne) Yoga.
His judgment revolves around the status of the retroflex la and the conjunct ksa.
I cast her chart in the early 90s, and saw her Venus was going to be conjunct with her Sun.
I cast her chart in the early 1990s, and saw her Venus was going to be conjunct with her Sun.
I learned that my moon is"conjunct to natal Venus," which meant I should"spend time with friends" because I was"particularly magnetic" that day.
They pointed out that the strong abnormal implicated torque pattern existed in the conjunct movement of shoulder abduction during elbow flexion and shoulder adduction during elbow extension.
Many musical terms exist to describe vocal patterns, including agility, fioritura, sostenuto, staccato, scalar, arpeggiated, conjunct, and disjunct.
system: that a claimant wins if the probability of each conjunct element
These flute and horn lines are mostly conjunct, though they each contain marked leaps of an ascending perfect fifth (mm.
In a 1958 article for La Revue musicale, critic Francoise Gervais cites the ornament's conjunct motion, independence from harmony, and the prevalence of triplets.