conjunctive

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Related to conjunctives: preposition

con·junc·tive

 (kən-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Joining; connective.
2. Joined together; combined: the conjunctive focus of political opposition.
3. Grammar
a. Of, relating to, or being a conjunction.
b. Serving to connect elements of meaning and construction within sentences, as and and since, or between sentences, as therefore.
n. Grammar
A connective word, especially a conjunction or conjunctive adverb.

con·junc′tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conjunctive

(kənˈdʒʌŋktɪv)
adj
1. joining; connective
2. joined
3. (Grammar) of or relating to conjunctions or their use
4. (Logic) logic relating to, characterized by, or containing a conjunction
n
(Grammar) a less common word for conjunction3
[C15: from Late Latin conjunctīvus, from Latin conjungere to conjoin]
conˈjunctively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•junc•tive

(kənˈdʒʌŋk tɪv)

adj.
1. serving to connect; connective: conjunctive tissue.
2. conjoined; joint.
3.
a. pertaining to, being, or functioning like a conjunction.
b. (of an adverb) serving to connect two clauses or sentences, as however or furthermore.
n.
4. a conjunctive word or expression; conjunction.
[1400–50; late Middle English conjunctif < Late Latin conjunctīvus. See conjunct, -ive]
con•junc′tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conjunctive - an uninflected function word that serves to conjoin words or phrases or clauses or sentences
closed-class word, function word - a word that is uninflected and serves a grammatical function but has little identifiable meaning
coordinating conjunction - a conjunction (like `and' or `or') that connects two identically constructed grammatical constituents
subordinate conjunction, subordinating conjunction - a conjunction (like `since' or `that' or `who') that introduces a dependent clause
Adj.1.conjunctive - serving or tending to connect
disjunctive - serving or tending to divide or separate
2.conjunctive - involving the joint activity of two or more; "concerted action"; "the conjunct influence of fire and strong wind"; "the conjunctive focus of political opposition"; "a cooperative effort"; "a united effort"; "joint military activities"
joint - united or combined; "a joint session of Congress"; "joint owners"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

conjunctive

[kənˈdʒʌŋktɪv] ADJconjuntivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conjunctive

adj (Gram, Anat) → Binde-
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The session were conducted under eye care services Programme FATA, where LHWs and teachers were made aware of the precautionary measures of communicable eye diseases, signs and symptoms of refractive errors, importance of vitamin A and management of allergic conjunctives, a spokesman of FATA directorate said.
During these sessions the Lady Health Workers and primary school teachers were made aware of the precautionary measures of communicable eye diseases, signs and symptoms of refractive errors, importance of vitamin A and management of allergic conjunctives etc.
Text bridges comprise three categories: subordinating words, transitional terms, and adverbial conjunctives (table 1).
Part I concludes with an analysis of Hebrew-English CS in one speaker, revealing ad hoc patterns of a mixed code, the usage of conjunctives (mainly English) and discourse markers (mainly Hebrew) indicating functional distribution.
The session were conducted under eye care services Program FATA, where Lady Health Workers and primary school teachers were made aware of the precautionary measures of communicable eye diseases, signs and symptoms of refractive errors, importance of vitamin A and management of allergic conjunctives etc.
In contrast, a "conjunctive FT FR 1" schedule imposes no temporal restrictions regarding where, within the FT component, the FR 1 component may be executed.