conjure


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con·jure

 (kŏn′jər, kən-jo͝or′)
v. con·jured, con·jur·ing, con·jures
v.tr.
1.
a. To summon (a devil or spirit) by magical or supernatural power.
b. To influence or effect by or as if by magic: tried to conjure away the doubts that beset her.
2.
a. To call or bring to mind; evoke: "Arizona conjures up an image of stark deserts for most Americans" (American Demographics).
b. To imagine; picture: "a sight to store away, then conjure up someday when they were no longer together" (Nelson DeMille).
3. Archaic To call on or entreat solemnly, especially by an oath.
v.intr.
1. To perform magic tricks, especially by sleight of hand.
2.
a. To summon a devil by magic or supernatural power.
b. To practice black magic.
n. (kŏn′jər) Chiefly Southern US
See hoodoo.
adj. Chiefly Southern US
Of or practicing folk magic: a conjure woman.

[Middle English conjuren, from Old French conjurer, to use a spell, from Late Latin coniūrāre, to pray by something holy, from Latin, to swear together : com-, com- + iūrāre, to swear; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

conjure

(ˈkʌndʒə)
vb
1. (intr) to practise conjuring or be a conjuror
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) (intr) to call upon supposed supernatural forces by spells and incantations
3. (tr) to appeal earnestly or strongly to: I conjure you to help me.
4. a name to conjure with
a. a person thought to have great power or influence
b. any name that excites the imagination
[C13: from Old French conjurer to plot, from Latin conjūrāre to swear together, form a conspiracy, from jūrāre to swear]

con•jure

(ˈkɒn dʒər, ˈkʌn- for 1–5, 8–10, 12; kənˈdʒʊər for 6, 7, 11 )

v. -jured, -jur•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to affect or influence by or as if by invocation or spell.
2. to effect or produce by or as if by magic: to conjure a miracle.
3. to call upon or command (a devil or spirit) by invocation or spell.
4. to call or bring into existence by or as if by magic (usu. fol. by up).
5. to bring to mind (usu. fol. by up).
6. to appeal to or charge solemnly.
v.i.
7. to call upon or command a devil or spirit by invocation or spell.
8. to practice magic.
9. to practice legerdemain.
n.
10. Chiefly Southern U.S. an act or instance of witchcraft.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French, Old French conjurer < Medieval Latin conjūrāre to conjure, invoke, Latin: to join in an oath =con- con- + jūrāre to swear, derivative of jūs law; compare jury1, justice]

conjure


Past participle: conjured
Gerund: conjuring

Imperative
conjure
conjure
Present
I conjure
you conjure
he/she/it conjures
we conjure
you conjure
they conjure
Preterite
I conjured
you conjured
he/she/it conjured
we conjured
you conjured
they conjured
Present Continuous
I am conjuring
you are conjuring
he/she/it is conjuring
we are conjuring
you are conjuring
they are conjuring
Present Perfect
I have conjured
you have conjured
he/she/it has conjured
we have conjured
you have conjured
they have conjured
Past Continuous
I was conjuring
you were conjuring
he/she/it was conjuring
we were conjuring
you were conjuring
they were conjuring
Past Perfect
I had conjured
you had conjured
he/she/it had conjured
we had conjured
you had conjured
they had conjured
Future
I will conjure
you will conjure
he/she/it will conjure
we will conjure
you will conjure
they will conjure
Future Perfect
I will have conjured
you will have conjured
he/she/it will have conjured
we will have conjured
you will have conjured
they will have conjured
Future Continuous
I will be conjuring
you will be conjuring
he/she/it will be conjuring
we will be conjuring
you will be conjuring
they will be conjuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conjuring
you have been conjuring
he/she/it has been conjuring
we have been conjuring
you have been conjuring
they have been conjuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conjuring
you will have been conjuring
he/she/it will have been conjuring
we will have been conjuring
you will have been conjuring
they will have been conjuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conjuring
you had been conjuring
he/she/it had been conjuring
we had been conjuring
you had been conjuring
they had been conjuring
Conditional
I would conjure
you would conjure
he/she/it would conjure
we would conjure
you would conjure
they would conjure
Past Conditional
I would have conjured
you would have conjured
he/she/it would have conjured
we would have conjured
you would have conjured
they would have conjured

conjure

To summon a devil or spirit using magic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.conjure - summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magicconjure - summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic; "raise the specter of unemployment"; "he conjured wild birds in the air"; "call down the spirits from the mountain"
anathemise, anathemize, bedamn, beshrew, damn, imprecate, maledict, curse - wish harm upon; invoke evil upon; "The bad witch cursed the child"
bless - give a benediction to; "The dying man blessed his son"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
call forth, evoke, kick up, provoke - evoke or provoke to appear or occur; "Her behavior provoked a quarrel between the couple"
2.conjure - ask for or request earnestlyconjure - ask for or request earnestly; "The prophet bid all people to become good persons"
plead - appeal or request earnestly; "I pleaded with him to stop"
3.conjure - engage in plotting or enter into a conspiracy, swear together; "They conspired to overthrow the government"
coconspire - conspire together; "The two men coconspired to cover up the Federal investigation"
plot - plan secretly, usually something illegal; "They plotted the overthrow of the government"

conjure

verb
1. produce, generate, bring about, give rise to, make, create, effect, produce as if by magic They managed to conjure up a victory.
2. (often with up) summon up, raise, invoke, rouse, call upon The ouija board is used to conjure up spirits and communicate with them.
conjure something up bring to mind, recall, evoke, recreate, recollect, produce as if by magic When he closed his eyes, he could conjure up almost every event of his life.

conjure

verb
Archaic. To make an earnest or urgent request:
Translations
يُمارِس الألْعاب السِّحْرِيَّه
čarovat
trylle
bûvészkedik
leika töfrabrögî
burtininkasdaryti fokususfokusininkaskerėtojas
burtrādīt trikus
predvádzať kúzla
sihirbazlık/hokkabazlık yapmak

conjure

1 [ˈkʌndʒəʳ] VIhacer juegos de manos
he conjures with handkerchiefshace trucos con pañuelos
a name to conjure withun personaje importante, una figura destacada
conjure away VT + ADVconjurar, hacer desaparecer
conjure up VT + ADV
1. [conjurer] [+ rabbit etc] → hacer aparecer
2. (fig) [+ memories, visions] → evocar; [+ meal] → preparar en un abrir y cerrar de ojos

conjure

2 [kənˈdʒʊəʳ] VT (liter) → suplicar
to conjure sb to do sthsuplicar a algn que haga algo

conjure

[ˈkʌndʒər]
vt
(by magic)faire apparaître (par la prestidigitation)
(fig)faire apparaître
vi
[entertainer] → faire des tours de passe-passe
a name to conjure with → un nom prestigieux
conjure up
vt
[+ ghost, spirit] → faire apparaître
[+ memories] → évoquer

conjure

1
vt (liter: = appeal to) → beschwören

conjure

2
vizaubern; a name to conjure withein Name, der Wunder wirkt or der eine Ausstrahlung hat
vtzaubern; image, memoryheraufbeschwören; to conjure something out of nothingetwas aus dem Nichts herbeizaubern

conjure

[ˈkʌndʒəʳ] vifare giochi di prestigio
a name to conjure with → un nome prestigioso or molto importante
conjure up vt + adv (memories) → evocare, rievocare; (ghost, spirit) → evocare; (meal) → inventare, improvvisare

conjure

(ˈkandʒə) , ((American) ˈkon-) verb
to perform tricks (conjuring tricks) that seem magical, as an entertainment.
ˈconjuror, ˈconjurer noun
References in classic literature ?
But by my love and hope I conjure thee: cast not thy love and hope away!
When she had recently insisted that the same man had been at the head of her father's creatures in an attempt to rescue her, both von Horn and Professor Maxon scoffed at the idea, until at last she was convinced that the fright and the firelight had conspired to conjure in her brain the likeness of one who was linked by memory to another time of danger and despair.
For some time I was lost in conjecture as to the cause of this, but yesterday an idea struck me, and if it is well founded, I conjure you to avow it.
Interpret my words with candour and answer me, I conjure you, with confidence and sincerity.
Speak, Brian de Bois-Guilbert, I conjure thee, by this symbol of our Holy Order.
I conjure thee, by the habit which thou dost wear, by the name thou dost inherit by the knighthood thou dost vaunt by the honour of thy mother by the tomb and the bones of thy father I conjure thee to say, are these things true?
Since I must die," he said, "before I choose the manner of my death, I conjure you on your honour to tell me if you really were in that vase?
As I mention 'Riverito, Maximina, Un Idilio de un Inferno, La Hermana de San Sulpizio, El Cuarto Poder, Espuma,' the mere names conjure up the scenes and events that have moved me to tears and laughter, and filled me with a vivid sense of the life portrayed in them.
of your dear mind, but by abandoning me, I conjure you drive me for
I would paint her the life and joy of the fire-side circle and the lively summer group; I would follow her through the sultry fields at noon, and hear the low tones of her sweet voice in the moonlit evening walk; I would watch her in all her goodness and charity abroad, and the smiling untiring discharge of domestic duties at home; I would paint her and her dead sister's child happy in their love for one another, and passing whole hours together in picturing the friends whom they had so sadly lost; I would summon before me, once again, those joyous little faces that clustered round her knee, and listen to their merry prattle; I would recall the tones of that clear laugh, and conjure up the sympathising tear that glistened in the soft blue eye.
Don Quixote in his trepidation began saying, "I conjure thee, phantom, or whatever thou art, tell me what thou art and what thou wouldst with me.
In this essay, I will examine Chesnutt's use of black folkloric material and vernacular forms in The Conjure Woman.