conjure

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Related to conjured: Abominations

con·jure

 (kŏn′jər, kən-jo͝or′)
v. con·jured, con·jur·ing, con·jures
v.tr.
1.
a. To summon (a devil or spirit) by magical or supernatural power.
b. To influence or effect by or as if by magic: tried to conjure away the doubts that beset her.
2.
a. To call or bring to mind; evoke: "Arizona conjures up an image of stark deserts for most Americans" (American Demographics).
b. To imagine; picture: "a sight to store away, then conjure up someday when they were no longer together" (Nelson DeMille).
3. Archaic To call on or entreat solemnly, especially by an oath.
v.intr.
1. To perform magic tricks, especially by sleight of hand.
2.
a. To summon a devil by magic or supernatural power.
b. To practice black magic.
n. (kŏn′jər) Chiefly Southern US
See hoodoo.
adj. Chiefly Southern US
Of or practicing folk magic: a conjure woman.

[Middle English conjuren, from Old French conjurer, to use a spell, from Late Latin coniūrāre, to pray by something holy, from Latin, to swear together : com-, com- + iūrāre, to swear; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

conjure

(ˈkʌndʒə)
vb
1. (intr) to practise conjuring or be a conjuror
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) (intr) to call upon supposed supernatural forces by spells and incantations
3. (tr) to appeal earnestly or strongly to: I conjure you to help me.
4. a name to conjure with
a. a person thought to have great power or influence
b. any name that excites the imagination
[C13: from Old French conjurer to plot, from Latin conjūrāre to swear together, form a conspiracy, from jūrāre to swear]

con•jure

(ˈkɒn dʒər, ˈkʌn- for 1–5, 8–10, 12; kənˈdʒʊər for 6, 7, 11 )

v. -jured, -jur•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to affect or influence by or as if by invocation or spell.
2. to effect or produce by or as if by magic: to conjure a miracle.
3. to call upon or command (a devil or spirit) by invocation or spell.
4. to call or bring into existence by or as if by magic (usu. fol. by up).
5. to bring to mind (usu. fol. by up).
6. to appeal to or charge solemnly.
v.i.
7. to call upon or command a devil or spirit by invocation or spell.
8. to practice magic.
9. to practice legerdemain.
n.
10. Chiefly Southern U.S. an act or instance of witchcraft.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French, Old French conjurer < Medieval Latin conjūrāre to conjure, invoke, Latin: to join in an oath =con- con- + jūrāre to swear, derivative of jūs law; compare jury1, justice]

conjure


Past participle: conjured
Gerund: conjuring

Imperative
conjure
conjure
Present
I conjure
you conjure
he/she/it conjures
we conjure
you conjure
they conjure
Preterite
I conjured
you conjured
he/she/it conjured
we conjured
you conjured
they conjured
Present Continuous
I am conjuring
you are conjuring
he/she/it is conjuring
we are conjuring
you are conjuring
they are conjuring
Present Perfect
I have conjured
you have conjured
he/she/it has conjured
we have conjured
you have conjured
they have conjured
Past Continuous
I was conjuring
you were conjuring
he/she/it was conjuring
we were conjuring
you were conjuring
they were conjuring
Past Perfect
I had conjured
you had conjured
he/she/it had conjured
we had conjured
you had conjured
they had conjured
Future
I will conjure
you will conjure
he/she/it will conjure
we will conjure
you will conjure
they will conjure
Future Perfect
I will have conjured
you will have conjured
he/she/it will have conjured
we will have conjured
you will have conjured
they will have conjured
Future Continuous
I will be conjuring
you will be conjuring
he/she/it will be conjuring
we will be conjuring
you will be conjuring
they will be conjuring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conjuring
you have been conjuring
he/she/it has been conjuring
we have been conjuring
you have been conjuring
they have been conjuring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conjuring
you will have been conjuring
he/she/it will have been conjuring
we will have been conjuring
you will have been conjuring
they will have been conjuring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conjuring
you had been conjuring
he/she/it had been conjuring
we had been conjuring
you had been conjuring
they had been conjuring
Conditional
I would conjure
you would conjure
he/she/it would conjure
we would conjure
you would conjure
they would conjure
Past Conditional
I would have conjured
you would have conjured
he/she/it would have conjured
we would have conjured
you would have conjured
they would have conjured

conjure

To summon a devil or spirit using magic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.conjure - summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magicconjure - summon into action or bring into existence, often as if by magic; "raise the specter of unemployment"; "he conjured wild birds in the air"; "call down the spirits from the mountain"
anathemise, anathemize, bedamn, beshrew, damn, imprecate, maledict, curse - wish harm upon; invoke evil upon; "The bad witch cursed the child"
bless - give a benediction to; "The dying man blessed his son"
create, make - make or cause to be or to become; "make a mess in one's office"; "create a furor"
call forth, evoke, kick up, provoke - evoke or provoke to appear or occur; "Her behavior provoked a quarrel between the couple"
2.conjure - ask for or request earnestlyconjure - ask for or request earnestly; "The prophet bid all people to become good persons"
plead - appeal or request earnestly; "I pleaded with him to stop"
3.conjure - engage in plotting or enter into a conspiracy, swear together; "They conspired to overthrow the government"
coconspire - conspire together; "The two men coconspired to cover up the Federal investigation"
plot - plan secretly, usually something illegal; "They plotted the overthrow of the government"

conjure

verb
1. produce, generate, bring about, give rise to, make, create, effect, produce as if by magic They managed to conjure up a victory.
2. (often with up) summon up, raise, invoke, rouse, call upon The ouija board is used to conjure up spirits and communicate with them.
conjure something up bring to mind, recall, evoke, recreate, recollect, produce as if by magic When he closed his eyes, he could conjure up almost every event of his life.

conjure

verb
Archaic. To make an earnest or urgent request:
Translations
يُمارِس الألْعاب السِّحْرِيَّه
čarovat
trylle
bûvészkedik
leika töfrabrögî
burtininkasdaryti fokususfokusininkaskerėtojas
burtrādīt trikus
predvádzať kúzla
sihirbazlık/hokkabazlık yapmak

conjure

1 [ˈkʌndʒəʳ] VIhacer juegos de manos
he conjures with handkerchiefshace trucos con pañuelos
a name to conjure withun personaje importante, una figura destacada
conjure away VT + ADVconjurar, hacer desaparecer
conjure up VT + ADV
1. [conjurer] [+ rabbit etc] → hacer aparecer
2. (fig) [+ memories, visions] → evocar; [+ meal] → preparar en un abrir y cerrar de ojos

conjure

2 [kənˈdʒʊəʳ] VT (liter) → suplicar
to conjure sb to do sthsuplicar a algn que haga algo

conjure

[ˈkʌndʒər]
vt
(by magic)faire apparaître (par la prestidigitation)
(fig)faire apparaître
vi
[entertainer] → faire des tours de passe-passe
a name to conjure with → un nom prestigieux
conjure up
vt
[+ ghost, spirit] → faire apparaître
[+ memories] → évoquer

conjure

1
vt (liter: = appeal to) → beschwören

conjure

2
vizaubern; a name to conjure withein Name, der Wunder wirkt or der eine Ausstrahlung hat
vtzaubern; image, memoryheraufbeschwören; to conjure something out of nothingetwas aus dem Nichts herbeizaubern

conjure

[ˈkʌndʒəʳ] vifare giochi di prestigio
a name to conjure with → un nome prestigioso or molto importante
conjure up vt + adv (memories) → evocare, rievocare; (ghost, spirit) → evocare; (meal) → inventare, improvvisare

conjure

(ˈkandʒə) , ((American) ˈkon-) verb
to perform tricks (conjuring tricks) that seem magical, as an entertainment.
ˈconjuror, ˈconjurer noun
References in classic literature ?
'He says we should not eat porridge, for he has conjured the whole oven full of roast meats and fish and cakes.'
'Goodness me!' said the farmer; and opening the oven he saw all the delicious, tempting dishes his wife had hidden there, but which he now believed the wizard in the sack had conjured up for them.
'He says,' replied Little Klans, 'that he has also conjured up for us three bottles of wine; they are standing in the corner by the oven!'
But suddenly there was the sharp report of a firearm, and another of Professor Maxon's unhappy experiments sank back into the nothingness from which he had conjured it.
Dim and wonderful is the vision I have conjured up in my mind of life spreading slowly from this little seed bed of the solar system throughout the inanimate vastness of sidereal space.
We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence.
The unfortunate duenna hearing herself thus conjured, by her own fear guessed Don Quixote's and in a low plaintive voice answered, "Senor Don Quixote- if so be you are indeed Don Quixote- I am no phantom or spectre or soul in purgatory, as you seem to think, but Dona Rodriguez, duenna of honour to my lady the duchess, and I come to you with one of those grievances your worship is wont to redress."