conjurement

conjurement

(kənˈdʒʊəmənt)
n
obsolete a solemn appeal or entreaty
References in periodicals archive ?
It makes little sense--if any--to get incensed, as Edmund Wilson did, because Nabokov chose the strangest or most obscure words (such as "prognostications" or "tears of conjurement") and to argue whether one could do better substituting "tit for tat." Instead it would be interesting in the remaining part of this discussion to investigate exactly how literalism is achieved and by what criteria we might assess the result.
Moreover, there are 5 occurrences of jugement and 2 of comberment in Guy of Warwick and the Poems of William of Shoreham also include jugement 5 times and conjurement 3 times.
Joy is a magical behaviour, which attempts through conjurement to gain instantaneous possession of the desired object.