conjuring


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con·jure

 (kŏn′jər, kən-jo͝or′)
v. con·jured, con·jur·ing, con·jures
v.tr.
1.
a. To summon (a devil or spirit) by magical or supernatural power.
b. To influence or effect by or as if by magic: tried to conjure away the doubts that beset her.
2.
a. To call or bring to mind; evoke: "Arizona conjures up an image of stark deserts for most Americans" (American Demographics).
b. To imagine; picture: "a sight to store away, then conjure up someday when they were no longer together" (Nelson DeMille).
3. Archaic To call on or entreat solemnly, especially by an oath.
v.intr.
1. To perform magic tricks, especially by sleight of hand.
2.
a. To summon a devil by magic or supernatural power.
b. To practice black magic.
n. (kŏn′jər) Chiefly Southern US
See hoodoo.
adj. Chiefly Southern US
Of or practicing folk magic: a conjure woman.

[Middle English conjuren, from Old French conjurer, to use a spell, from Late Latin coniūrāre, to pray by something holy, from Latin, to swear together : com-, com- + iūrāre, to swear; see yewes- in Indo-European roots.]

conjuring

(ˈkʌndʒərɪŋ)
n
the performance of tricks that appear to defy natural laws
adj
denoting or relating to such tricks or entertainment
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conjuring - calling up a spirit or devilconjuring - calling up a spirit or devil  
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
summoning, evocation - calling up supposed supernatural forces by spells and incantations

conjuring

noun magic, juggling, trickery, sleight of hand, legerdemain, prestidigitation The show includes performances of conjuring, dancing, and exhibitions of strength.
Translations

conjuring

[ˈkʌndʒərɪŋ]
B. CPD conjuring trick Njuego m de manos

conjuring

nZaubern nt; (= performance)Zauberei f; conjuring trickZaubertrick m, → (Zauber)kunststück nt

conjuring

[ˈkʌndʒərɪŋ]
2. adj conjuring trickgioco di prestigio
References in classic literature ?
Therefore the shortest cut for conjuring Is stoutly to abjure all godliness, And pray devoutly to the prince of hell.
I will, sir: but hark you, master; will you teach me this conjuring occupation?
I confess to having received a few simple lessons in conjuring, in a dimly lighted chamber beneath a shop, from a gifted young man with a long neck and a pimply face, who as I entered took a barber's pole from my pocket, saying at the same time, "Come, come, sir, this will never do." Whether because he knew too much, or because he wore a trick shirt, he was the most depressing person I ever encountered; he felt none of the artist's joy, and it was sad to see one so well calculated to give pleasure to thousands not caring a dump about it.
As you shall see, I invented many stories for David, practising the telling of them by my fireside as if they were conjuring feats, while Irene knew only one, but she told it as never has any other fairy-tale been told in my hearing.
Reehil wrote, "The curses and spells used in the books are actual curses and spells; which when read by a human being risk conjuring evil spirits into the presence of the person reading the text."
'Annabelle Comes Home' is basically the third Annabelle film following 'Annabelle' (2014) and 'Annabelle Creation' (2017) and the seventh film in the Conjuring horror franchise.
The characters of Ed and Lorraine in the entire Conjuring franchise are played by Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga.
There was a movie titled 'The Conjuring' that had paranormal investigators and demonologists delving into strange phenomena and other events that bordered on the macabre.
Annabelle Comes Home is the third instalment in the series and the seventh instalment in the Conjuring universe franchise.
The cinematic 'Conjuring' universe -- an interconnected series of hit horror films that began with 2013's 'The Conjuring' -- has been a critically mixed bag.
Following on from the Annabelle flicks and The Nun, The Conjuring cinematic universe continues to expand with this 1970s-set chiller.
Written by Witchdoctor Utu, founder of the Niagara Voodoo Shrine, "Conjuring Harriet "Mama Moses" Tubman and the Spirits of the Underground Railroad" is the first book devoted to the spiritual and magical tradition of the Underground Railroad.