conkers


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con·ker 1

 (kŏng′kər) Chiefly British
n.
1. A horse chestnut.
2. con·kers A game in which two players swing horse chestnuts strung on string, each trying to use his or her horse chestnut to shatter his or her opponent's.

[From British English dialectal conker, snail shell used in the original form of the game of conkers (in which two snail shells were pressed together until one broke), either from alteration of conqueror, one that conquers, hard snail shell that had won many games of conkers, or from variant of conch, or from a combination of both .]

con·ker 2

 (kŏng′kər)
n.
One that conks or hits.

[conk + -er.]

con·ker 3

 (kŏng′kər)
n.
One that conks, as when styling hair.

[conk + -er.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conkers

(ˈkɒŋkəz)
n
(Games, other than specified) (functioning as singular) Brit a game in which a player swings a horse chestnut (conker), threaded onto a string, against that of another player to try to break it
[C19: from dialect conker snail shell, originally used in the game]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
THE annual fireworks display at Conkers has been extended this year to two nights.
By NEIL SHAW & DAVE HIMELFIELD editorial@examiner.co.uk DOG owners are being warned that their pets are at risk - from conkers.
One advert description read: PS5.70, you'll receive 50 fresh conkers - next day shipping guaranteed."
The horse chestnut trees are starting to drop and you're bound to find some great conkers in among the dead leaves.
Martha Boalch, citizen science officer for the Woodland Trust, said: "This year's heatwave will have encouraged fruit to grow more rapidly, but lack of water may have stopped conkers from growing to their full potential.
DURING the past couple of weeks I've seen lots of families gathering around horse chestnut trees looking for 'conkers' that have fallen to the ground.
Under the banner headline, "Conkers a clarification", he states: "Contrary to what you may have heard or read, the game of conkers has NOT been banned at St Rooney's."
This year, we are asking you to tell us about your favourite places to find conkers around the North East - if you are willing to share the spoils - and your memories of finding conkers and conker fights.
Youngsters playing conkers in the 1970s conkers are the seed of the horse chestnut tree which fall to the ground in autumn so, when you've made an eaten your delicious curry, why not head out for a walk to collect conkers and play one of the oldest games around (ask your dad and grandad if they used to play and the answer will undoubtedly be 'yes').
Youngsters playing conkers in the 1970s conkers are the seed of the horse chestnut tree which fall to the ground in autumn so, when you've made and eaten your delicious curry, why not head out for a walk to collect conkers and play one of the oldest games around (ask your dad and grandad if they used to play and the answer will undoubtedly be 'yes').
So far it has collected about 1,500 of the nuts, known as conkers after the traditional schoolyard game in which children try to smash them.