connective tissue


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connective tissue

n.
Tissue arising chiefly from the embryonic mesoderm that is characterized by a highly vascular matrix and includes collagenous, elastic, and reticular fibers, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. It forms the supporting and connecting structures of the body.

connective tissue

n
(Zoology) an animal tissue developed from the embryonic mesoderm that consists of collagen or elastic fibres, fibroblasts, fatty cells, etc, within a jelly-like matrix. It supports organs, fills the spaces between them, and forms tendons and ligaments

connec′tive tis`sue


n.
a kind of tissue, usu. of mesoblastic origin, that connects, supports, or surrounds other tissues and organs, including tendons, bone, cartilage, and fatty tissue.
[1880–85]

con·nec·tive tissue

(kə-nĕk′tĭv)
Tissue that forms the framework and supporting structures of the body, including bone, cartilage, mucous membrane, and fat.

connective tissue

1. Tissue that connects parts of the body, e.g. adipose tissue.
2. The body’s most widespread type of tissue: supporting, linking, storing, and holding organs in place. It includes blood, bone, and cartilage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cellsconnective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cutis, skin, tegument - a natural protective body covering and site of the sense of touch; "your skin is the largest organ of your body"
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
areolar tissue - fibrous connective tissue with the fibers arranged in a mesh or net
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
bone marrow, marrow - the fatty network of connective tissue that fills the cavities of bones
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
elastic tissue - connective tissue consisting chiefly of elastic fibers found in the dermis of the skin and in the walls of veins and arteries and in some tendons and ligaments
endoneurium - delicate connective tissue around individual nerve fibers in nerve
ligament - a sheet or band of tough fibrous tissue connecting bones or cartilages or supporting muscles or organs
perineurium - the sheath of connective tissue that covers a bundle of nerve fibers
perimysium - the sheath of connective tissue that covers a bundle of muscle fibers
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
submucosa - the connective tissue beneath mucous membrane
histiocyte - a macrophage that is found in connective tissue
ground substance, intercellular substance, matrix - the body substance in which tissue cells are embedded
facia, fascia - a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etc
scar tissue - the connective tissue that forms a scar; consists of fibroblasts in new scars and collagen fibers in old scars
labrocyte, mast cell, mastocyte - a large connective tissue cell that contains histamine and heparin and serotonin which are released in allergic reactions or in response to injury or inflammation
granulation, granulation tissue - new connective tissue and tiny blood vessels that form on the surfaces of a wound during the healing process
Translations
pojivová tkáň

connective tissue

nBindegewebe nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), Un-differentiated connective tissue disease (UDCT), anti-ribonucleoprotien antibody (RNP).
While assimilating a growing stack of technology assets within the body of healthcare and life sciences organizations, we seem to have (physiologically speaking) forgotten the essential role of connective tissue. The urgency of the investment to address this missing element can be captured in three perspectives:
In Kerodon rupestres, the connective tissue is intermingled with the gland, forming trabeculae in the cells (Lima et al., 2008).
Heritable disorders of connective tissue affecting the arterial wall are recognized in a minority of arterial diseases of the central nervous system, such as arterial dissections.
Biopharmaceutical company MediWound (NasdaqGM:MDWD) reported on Tuesday the receipt of patent from the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for claims related to the its proprietary injectable bromelain solution, MWPC003, for enzymatic treatment of connective tissue diseases.
Skeletal muscle is composed of muscle tissue and connective tissue. Muscle tissue is made up of muscle cells known as muscle fibers whereas connective tissue is mainly made up of fibroblasts (which secrete collagen, elastin, reticulum fibers and ground substance such as glycoprotein and proteoglycans) and other cells including adipocytes, plasma cells, lymphocytes, macrophages and mast cells (Karunaratne et al., 2005).
* Mixed connective tissue disease is relatively rare and the vast majority of people with the disease (80 percent) are women.
They've found that during the course of the disease, the stem cells become less able to make new muscle and instead begin to express genes involved in the formation of connective tissue. Excess connective tissue--a condition called fibrosis-can accumulate in many organs, including the lungs, liver and heart, in many different disorders.
Studies on connective tissue have produced valuable data, which have stimulated the creation of treatments for preventive and rejuvenative healthcare.
New York, NY, August 10, 2014 --(PR.com)-- Elisabeth Dicke, a former German physiotherapist, developed a systematic, scientifically based treatment method of connective tissue massage (or Bindegewebsmassage) which is now used throughout the world.
Peptinex[TM] collagen is an excellent source of bio-available protein, the same protein found in human skin, connective tissue and other parts of the body.
Autotomy mechanisms in echinoderms depend on the ability of the connective tissue to change its mechanical properties (Wilkie, 1979, 1984, 2001, 2005; Motokawa, 1982; Motokawa and Tsuchi, 2003; Motokawa et aL, 2012).

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