connotation


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con·no·ta·tion

 (kŏn′ə-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of connoting.
2.
a. An idea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing: Hollywood holds connotations of romance and glittering success.
b. The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.
3. Logic The set of attributes constituting the meaning of a term; intension.

con′no·ta′tive adj.
con′no·ta′tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

connotation

(ˌkɒnəˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Linguistics) an association or idea suggested by a word or phrase; implication
2. the act or fact of connoting
3. (Logic) logic another word for intension1
connotative, conˈnotive adj
ˈconnoˌtatively, conˈnotively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•no•ta•tion

(ˌkɒn əˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of connoting.
2. the associated or secondary meaning of a word or expression in addition to its explicit or primary meaning: The word home often has the connotation “a place of warmth and affection.” Compare denotation (def. 1).
[1525–35; late Middle English < Medieval Latin]
con•no•ta•tive (ˈkɒn əˌteɪ tɪv, kəˈnoʊ tə-) adj.
con′no•ta`tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.connotation - what you must know in order to determine the reference of an expression
meaning, signification, import, significance - the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
2.connotation - an idea that is implied or suggested
meaning, substance - the idea that is intended; "What is the meaning of this proverb?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

connotation

noun implication, colouring, association, suggestion, significance, nuance, undertone It's just one of those words that's got so many negative connotations.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

connotation

noun
1. Something, such as a feeling, thought, or idea, associated in one's mind or imagination with a specific person or thing:
2. That which is signified by a word or expression:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
konotace
bibetydningkonnotationmedbetydning
konnotaatio
associatiebijbetekenisbijklankconnotatiegevoelswaarde
konnotasjon

connotation

[ˌkɒnəʊˈteɪʃən] Nconnotación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

connotation

[ˌkɒnəˈteɪʃən] nconnotation f, implication f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

connotation

nAssoziation f, → Konnotation f (spec); the connotations of this worddie mit diesem Wort verbundenen Assoziationen, die Konnotationen dieses Wortes (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

connotation

[ˌkɒnəʊˈteɪʃn] nconnotazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
There was more than that in the connotation of his name.
Woman that adventured were adventuresses, and the connotation was not nice.
By word and sound, to Jerry, "Mister Haggin" had the same connotation that "God" has to God-worshipping humans.
They had been diverted from their hereditary connotation to signify impressions for which Nature did not intend them.
Questions to be asked in regard to external style are such as these: Is it good or bad, careful or careless, clear and easy or confused and difficult; simple or complex; terse and forceful (perhaps colloquial) or involved and stately; eloquent, balanced, rhythmical; vigorous, or musical, languid, delicate and decorative; varied or monotonous; plain or figurative; poor or rich in connotation and poetic suggestiveness; beautiful, or only clear and strong?
"Human science can never be quite certain of things like that," said Father Brown, still looking at the red budding of the branches over his head, "if only because of the difficulty about definition and connotation. What is a weapon?
Here were connotations of the saloon making deep indentations in a child's mind.
On the other hand, he appreciated the chance effects in words and phrases that came lightly and easily into his brain, and that later stood all tests of beauty and power and developed tremendous and incommunicable connotations. Before such he bowed down and marvelled, knowing that they were beyond the deliberate creation of any man.
Its effect was electrical, for on the instant all the connotations of "Michael" flooded his consciousness.
Saxon spelled the three words aloud, letter by letter, for she did not dare their pronunciation; and in her consciousness glimmered august connotations, profound and unthinkable.
Old history, the South Seas Sailing Directions, scores of remembered data and connotations swift and furious, surged through his brain.
Meanwhile, Herrera was saddened by the movie's 'bad connotation to the public,' but remained 'the audience is evolving.