connotative


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con·no·ta·tion

 (kŏn′ə-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of connoting.
2.
a. An idea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing: Hollywood holds connotations of romance and glittering success.
b. The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.
3. Logic The set of attributes constituting the meaning of a term; intension.

con′no·ta′tive adj.
con′no·ta′tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.connotative - having the power of implying or suggesting something in addition to what is explicit
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"
denotative, denotive - having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

connotative

adjective
Tending to bring a memory, mood, or image, for example, subtly or indirectly to mind:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

connotative

[ˈkɒnəˌteɪtɪv] ADJconnotativo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

connotative

adj meaningNeben-, assoziativ, konnotativ (spec)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

connotative

[ˈkɒnəˌteɪtɪv] adjconnotativo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Linguists and social scientists have not yet reached a consensus regarding the universally agreed upon literal or connotative meanings of Islamophobia as a word, or a concept.
The secondary layer, which handles the connotative or symbolic level of meaning (Adeyanju, 2011), deals with indirect speech acts- utterances in which one says one thing and means another; or says one thing and means what one says and also means another illocution with a different propositional content (Adegbija, 1982:32).
Denotative words can be substituted with connotative ones by those who are cognitively refined.
The word good has a rich history and many connotative meanings that are spread out over a good six pages in the Oxford English Dictionary.
This particular word, too, carried such a connotative shock to the conscience of some who heard the president use it that it derailed the immigration deal that was under discussion.
The connotative meaning of the word 'Protocol' as used by both speakers means an accepted code of behaviour in an organisation.
To study the nuanced biases in narratives, the researchers expanded prior work presented in 2016 on "connotation frames" that give insights into how different verbs can empower or weaken different characters through their connotative meanings.
For Hall, making visible the processes through which meaning is produced and transformed--especially in terms of denotative and connotative functions (3)--allows us to grasp how particular representations come to dominate, and recognize that representation is dependent on circuits of textual production and the exchange of meanings between members of a given culture.
He has been variously labeled in various societies as traitor, patriot, blasphemer, messiah, prophet and more-all connotative of visions, danger, the extreme, the outre.
As physicians, we require both denotative and connotative information for practice--that is, we need data and intuition, the science and art.