conquerable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

con·quer

 (kŏng′kər)
v. con·quered, con·quer·ing, con·quers
v.tr.
1.
a. To gain control of or subdue by military force: conquered the neighboring lands.
b. To defeat in war: The Greeks conquered the Persians. See Synonyms at defeat.
2.
a. To eliminate or minimize (a difficulty, for example): vaccines that conquered smallpox; programs to conquer poverty.
b. To overcome or surmount mentally or emotionally: You must conquer your fear of heights.
3. To reach the summit of (a mountain) by climbing.
4.
a. To gain the affection or admiration of: back when jazz conquered Paris.
b. To seduce.
v.intr.
To be victorious; win.

[Middle English conqueren, from Old French conquerre, from Vulgar Latin *conquaerere, from Latin conquīrere, to procure : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + quaerere, to seek.]

con′quer·a·ble adj.
con′quer·or, con′quer·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.conquerable - subject to being conquered or overcome; "knew her fears were ultimately conquerable"
surmountable - capable of being surmounted or overcome; "situations of measurable and surmountable danger"
vulnerable - susceptible to attack; "a vulnerable bridge"
unconquerable - not capable of being conquered or vanquished or overcome; "a tribute to his courage...and his unconquerable will"- R.E.Danielson; "faced unconquerable difficulties"
2.conquerable - capable of being surmounted or excelled
surmountable - capable of being surmounted or overcome; "situations of measurable and surmountable danger"
References in classic literature ?
The reflections of Sir Mulberry Hawk--if such a term can be applied to the thoughts of the systematic and calculating man of dissipation, whose joys, regrets, pains, and pleasures, are all of self, and who would seem to retain nothing of the intellectual faculty but the power to debase himself, and to degrade the very nature whose outward semblance he wears--the reflections of Sir Mulberry Hawk turned upon Kate Nickleby, and were, in brief, that she was undoubtedly handsome; that her coyness MUST be easily conquerable by a man of his address and experience, and that the pursuit was one which could not fail to redound to his credit, and greatly to enhance his reputation with the world.
We used to think cancer was conquerable. Today, that idea is often laughed off as utopian.
Is meaning a guaranteed product of the process of representation and is therefore conquerable? Or is it (meaning) endlessly deferred in an ongoing process of signification, emulating, in one sense or another, the eternal state of death with which she begins her story?
The second, a Category 1 over 1,050 meters, again looked conquerable for the 7-Eleven Cliqq Roadbike Philippines skipper.
Like The Cherry Orchard, Cromer asserts, Angels is "not conquerable," and we can expect to see newly revelatory productions for years to come.
Other players have had more success, and a few aficionados have shown that the game is, in fact, conquerable.
Through actionable advice and poignant personal stories, the panel showed attendees that the process of struggle and self-doubt is difficult but ultimately conquerable.
Those with high self-efficacy expect favorable outcomes as a result of their efforts and view weaknesses as being conquerable through effort, whereas those with low self-efficacy expect their efforts to fail.
Yet future recruitment at all venues can be maximized if specific (but conquerable) barriers are overcome.
Scoring will definitely be low with long but flat Pradera Verde seen to be a conquerable course with only its length as its best defense.
The mountain is described by Malaysian tourism officials as one of the "safest and most conquerable" peaks in the world and tens of thousands are reckoned to make the ascent each year.
But on the shores of tranquil Ullswater, bordered by majestic yet reassuringly conquerable mountains and fells, Sharrow Bay is unique; the epitome of English country living.