conscience clause


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conscience clause

n.
A clause in a law that relieves persons whose conscientious or religious scruples forbid compliance.

conscience clause

n
(Law) a clause in a law or contract exempting persons with moral scruples
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The loss of the diversity of theological perspectives with the rescinding of the conscience clause and the clear message that the only valid form of ministry is ordained ministry is a disservice to the rich history of our beloved church.
The plaque's reference to Barlow's work as a peace ambassador reflects the role he played in helping to secure the so-called 'conscience clause' in the 1916 Military Service Act which enabled those of conscience to abstain from military service.
During a linked motion, Sinn Fein delegates also voted by at least a five-to-one split to oppose any introduction of a conscience clause for members.
The DUP have stalled all progress on equal marriage in Northern Ireland and they previously supported the introduction of a "conscience clause" to protect any bigots who discriminate against LGBT people.
The general pharmaceutical Council, the body which regulates the British pharmaceutical industry's professional standards, has decided to retain its conscience clause allowing for pharmacists to refer patients to other professionals if they feel they cannot provide certain medications in good conscience.
The latest attempt by the so-called Dump Trump camp of GOP members came last week when a group of delegates led by Kendal Unruh of Colorado called for a conscience clause at the convention that would give delegates a kind of conscientious objector status and thus pave the way for (http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/07/politics/donald-trump-alternative-candidate/) another candidate to take Trump's place.
The discussion on the possibilities as well as the purposefulness of restricting medical conscience clause has been ongoing for quite a long time in Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia as well as other states of law.
That the court took for granted that a hospital was protected by a privilege applicable to strictly religious entities speaks to the power of the "conscience clause," statutory language that establishes a right to refuse service to someone if providing it runs counter to deeply held religious or ethical beliefs.
A so-called "conscience clause" allows doctors to deny abortions on the grounds that it violates their personal beliefs, and women who pursue abortions face stigmatization in predominantly Catholic Poland.
ADOPTING a "conscience clause" could trigger a boycott similar to one affecting a US state that adopted a similar law change, the Assembly was warned yesterday.
"But as a result of campaigning by the No Conscription Fellowship, a conscience clause was written into the Act whereby people could refuse to fight on religious or moral grounds."