conscientiously


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con·sci·en·tious

 (kŏn′shē-ĕn′shəs)
adj.
1. Guided by or in accordance with the dictates of conscience; principled: a conscientious decision to speak out about injustice.
2. Thorough and assiduous: a conscientious worker; a conscientious effort to comply with the regulations. See Synonyms at diligent.

[Obsolete French conscientieux, from Medieval Latin cōnscientiōsus, from Latin cōnscientia, conscience; see conscience.]

con′sci·en′tious·ly adv.
con′sci·en′tious·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.conscientiously - with extreme conscientiousness; "he came religiously every morning at 8 o'clock"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بِضَمير حَي، قائِمٌ بِواجِباتِهِ
svědomitě
pligtopfyldende
lelkiismeretesen
samviskusamlega
svedomito
dikkatletitizlikle

conscientiously

[ˌkɒnʃɪˈenʃəslɪ] ADVconcienzudamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

conscientiously

[ˌkɒnʃiˈɛnʃəsli] adv [work] → consciencieusement
to study sth conscientiously → étudier qch consciencieusementconscientious objector nobjecteur m de conscience
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

conscientiously

adv practise, exercisegewissenhaft; obeypflichtschuldigst
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

conscientiously

[ˌkɒnʃɪˈɛnʃəslɪ] advcoscienziosamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

conscientious

(konʃiˈenʃəs) adjective
careful and hard-working. a conscientious pupil.
ˌconsciˈentiously adverb
ˌconsciˈentiousness noun
ˌconscientious obˈjector noun
a person who refuses to serve in the armed forces for moral or religious reasons.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In transcribing his notes and fortifying their claim to attention by giving them something of an orderly arrangement, I have conscientiously refrained from embellishing them with such small ornaments of diction as I may have felt myself able to bestow, which would not only have been impertinent, even if pleasing, but would have given me a somewhat closer relation to the work than I should care to have and to avow.--A.
I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever.
Steady to his purpose, he scarcely spoke ten words to her through the whole of Saturday, and though they were at one time left by themselves for half-an-hour, he adhered most conscientiously to his book, and would not even look at her.
All that I could conscientiously say on this very difficult and delicate subject, I have said.
At the door of the Uffizzi, in Florence, one is confronted by statues of a man and a woman, noseless, battered, black with accumulated grime--they hardly suggest human beings-- yet these ridiculous creatures have been thoughtfully and conscientiously fig-leaved by this fastidious generation.
He really felt conscientiously vexed on the occasion; for the very exertion to which he had limited the performance of his promise to his father was by this arrangement rendered impracticable.-- The furniture was all sent around by water.
Passepartout, who had conscientiously studied the programme of his duties, was more than surprised to see his master guilty of the inexactness of appearing at this unaccustomed hour; for, according to rule, he was not due in Saville Row until precisely midnight.
He was a man of few words, who gave his lesson conscientiously but without enthusiasm, arriving as the clock struck and leaving on the minute.
It was not only that Tourguenief had painted life truly, but that he had painted it conscientiously.
I might also urge that I was helping to save the life of a woman, and even a lawyer may do that conscientiously.
She kindly informed Alicia that she wished her well, though she could not conscientiously look upon her as a lawful married woman; and she begged me (in case I got off), the next time I met with a respectable person who was kind to me, to profit by remembering my past errors, and to treat my next benefactress with more confidence than I had treated her.
I used to wonder, when they came in tired from the fields, their feet numb and their hands cracked and sore, how they could do all the chores so conscientiously: feed and water and bed the horses, milk the cows, and look after the pigs.