conscious sedation


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Related to conscious sedation: Moderate Sedation

conscious sedation

n.
Sedation involving the administration of anesthesia without loss of consciousness, used to minimize pain and anxiety in a patient undergoing a minor surgical or diagnostic procedure.
References in periodicals archive ?
For patients especially fearful of dentistry, however, the Sacramento Dentistry Group offers oral conscious sedation to eliminate anxiety and painful sensations.
He also will be permanently banned from performing conscious sedation, and he will be on probation for five years after the license suspension is lifted.
The practice of non-anaesthetist sedationists in Australia is not well documented, but it is expected that non-anaesthetist sedation providers usually target conscious sedation (4).
Initially, conscious sedation with intravenous midazolam and fentanyl was administered to all patients prior to fiducial implantation.
Since 1997, Paul has been involved in establishing conscious sedation services in primary care to reduce dependency on hospital based general anaesthesia.
For example, dental conscious sedation is a technique whereby a sedative medication is used to relax and sedate patients who are very anxious about receiving dental treatment.
The benefits of increased patient safety and effectiveness of sedation have been well documented for general anesthesia (4-6) and may be applicable to conscious sedation practices.
The researchers compared 20 cases that used conscious sedation during surgery for stage II, III, or IV gliomas and compared them with 19 cases that used general anesthesia.
This article will cover common agents and the use of conscious sedation.
Her development of the curriculum led to the provision of a masters in conscious sedation which is now training clinicians in a skill known to be in short supply.
Requirements to obtain the permit include that the dentist have a minimum of 75 hours of study including training in conscious sedation, with supervised experience providing conscious sedation to 20 or more patients.
The doctors wanted to learn if surgeries that used conscious sedation - in which patients are initially anesthetized but restored to consciousness during surgery on the brain itself - had outcomes different from those using more traditional general anesthesia.