conscriptionist

conscriptionist

(kənˈskrɪpʃənɪst)
n
(Military) a person who is in favour of conscription

con•scrip•tion•ist

(kənˈskrɪp ʃə nɪst)

n.
an advocate or supporter of conscription.
[1900–05]
References in periodicals archive ?
Elsewhere, the Manchester Guardian described the military imagery that shaped the theatre set: "The theatre--stage, stalls, and even gallery--was ablaze with uniforms, and a military band played itself into the theatre and gave a robust selection between the second and third acts" ("Conscriptionist Play").
(4) This version was repeated during the 1930s by Labor politician and civil libertarian Maurice Blackburn: until Hughes' volte-face 'neither the Labour Movement nor its leaders were conscriptionist'.
The conscriptionist ministers considered forming their own administration, but acknowledged that the government's collapse could split the country--supposedly King's greatest fear.
In France, with its conscriptionist army with a sou a day for each soldier, there is, of course, a general restriction of spending power.
1914-1919, Jutland veteran; Anti conscriptionist pre war and until 1942 when he abandoned anti conscription stance.
Because the question did not contain the word conscription, Antis naturally thought it was a trap, designed to obscure the conscriptionist's real desire to introduce permanent 'Conscription'.
Like the QIA, Duhig had to be inclusive, finding room in his flock for anti-conscriptionists, such as Fihelly and Murphy, alongside other equally prominent QIA members who were conscriptionists, such as the lawyer Andrew Thynne MLC and the prominent Fortitude Valley merchant T.C.
By March 1917 a number of Section leaders took advantage of the state election to fill some of the gaps in Parliament left by expelled conscriptionists. These included John Doyle (Phillip), William O'Brien (Annandale), Carlo Lazzarini (Marrickville), Michael Burke (Belmore), Thomas Mutch (Botany), William McKell (Redfern), V.C.R.W.
(77) Her actions highlighted the intolerance of the conscriptionists, and elevated her in the eyes of many to a martyr for the cause.
But for the conscriptionists, a referendum would entail unacceptable delay and the people just might conceivably vote against compulsory service, as they had in Australia.