consequential

(redirected from consequentiality)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to consequentiality: consequentialist

con·se·quen·tial

 (kŏn′sĭ-kwĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Following as an effect, result, or conclusion; consequent.
2. Having important consequences; significant: "The year's only really consequential legislation was the reform of Social Security" (New York Times).
3.
a. Important; influential: a consequential figure in the academic community.
b. Pompous; self-important: "He's a proud, haughty, consequential, turned-up-nosed peacock" (Charles Dickens).

con′se·quen′ti·al′i·ty (-shē-ăl′ĭ-tē), con′se·quen′tial·ness n.
con′se·quen′tial·ly adv.

consequential

(ˌkɒnsɪˈkwɛnʃəl)
adj
1. important or significant
2. self-important; conceited
3. following as a consequence; resultant, esp indirectly: consequential loss.
ˌconseˌquentiˈality, ˌconseˈquentialness n
ˌconseˈquentially adv
Usage: Although both consequential and consequent can refer to something which happens as the result of something else, consequent is more common in this sense in modern English: the new measures were put into effect, and the consequent protest led to the dismissal of those responsible

con•se•quen•tial

(ˌkɒn sɪˈkwɛn ʃəl)

adj.
1. following as an effect, result, or outcome; resultant; consequent.
2. following as a logical conclusion or inference; logically consistent.
3. of consequence or importance.
4. self-important; pompous.
[1620–30]
con`se•quen`ti•al′i•ty, con`se•quen′tial•ness, n.
con`se•quen′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.consequential - having important issues or results; "the year's only really consequential legislation"; "an eventful decision"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"

consequential

adjective
1. resulting, subsequent, successive, ensuing, indirect, consequent, resultant, sequential, following The company disclaims any liability for incidental or consequential damages.
2. important, serious, significant, grave, far-reaching, momentous, weighty, eventful From a medical standpoint, a week is usually not a consequential delay.

consequential

adjective
2. Having or exercising influence:
Translations

consequential

[ˌkɒnsɪˈkwenʃəl] ADJ
1. (= resulting) → consiguiente, resultante
the moves consequential upon this decisionlas medidas consiguientes a or resultantes de esta decisión
2. (= important) → importante

consequential

adj
(= self-important)wichtigtuerisch; smile, tone alsoüberheblich
(= logically consistent)folgerichtig

consequential

[ˌkɒnsɪˈkwɛnʃəl] adj (frm)
a. (important) → importante
b. (consequent) → conseguente
References in periodicals archive ?
Such questions have been used in recent literature to assess respondent perceptions of the consequentiality of their responses (e.
There is a suggestion of consequentiality about the statement, as though it was more than a sketch on a folio sheet.
According to Skelcher (2005), the normative theory of polycentricity aims to introduce the behavioral logic of consequentiality into provision of public goods and services.
but to focus on the consequentiality of representations of that reality.
Special focus will involve those Nile Basin territories, which are witnessing and foreseen to witness significant demographic, social and economic dynamics and environmental consequentiality.
Although this principle is worked out differently by different theorists, the general principle of consequentiality is found throughout practice theory.
Indeed, urban landscapes were frequently depicted as allegories, metaphors or metonymies, with their consequentiality to human individual and collective experiences, presupposing an inactive position.
Chiefs embody a heroic personhood, as Sahlins says, but chiefly action has different kinds of consequentiality, either as rupture or as establishment, depending on their progress in an annual liturgy.
The main objective of the fellowship is to develop an original empirical research programme, testing the effects of the consequentiality of epistemic decisions on reasoning.
Referendum valuation questions are increasing in incentive compatibility with their consequentiality (Carson, 2012a, 2012b).
than that he should be at every moment both within things and outside of them"; the dialectic "advances by way of extremes, driving thoughts with the utmost consequentiality to the point where they turn back on themselves.
With most of the internet being open to state scrutiny, it is becoming a matter of increasing urgency to be able to ascertain consequentiality of opinion expressed online.