conservatism


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con·ser·va·tism

 (kən-sûr′və-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The inclination, especially in politics, to maintain the existing or traditional order.
2. A political philosophy or attitude that emphasizes respect for traditional institutions and opposes the attempt to achieve social change though legislation or publicly funded programs.
3. Caution or moderation, as in behavior or outlook.

conservatism

(kənˈsɜːvəˌtɪzəm)
n
1. opposition to change and innovation
2. a political philosophy advocating the preservation of the best of the established order in society and opposing radical change

Conservatism

(kənˈsɜːvəˌtɪzəm)
(in Britain, Canada, etc) n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the form of conservatism advocated by the Conservative Party
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the policies, doctrines, or practices of the Conservative Party

con•serv•a•tism

(kənˈsɜr vəˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the disposition to preserve or restore what is established or traditional and to limit change.
2. the principles and practices of political conservatives.
[1825–35]

conservatism

1. the disposition to retain what is established and to practice a policy of gradualism rather than abrupt change. Cf. radicalism.
2. the principles and practices of political conservatives, especially of the British Conservative party. — conservative, n., adj.
See also: Politics

Conservatism

 

blimp See POMPOSITY.

Dame Partington and her mop Stubborn and futile opposition to the inevitable, particularly to economic, political, or social reform. This infrequently used expression is derived from English newspaper stories of November 1824 which tell of a woman who used only a mop in attempting to rid her nearly inundated seaside home of water during a raging storm. The woman eventually gave up her struggle and sought safety elsewhere. In October 1831, Rev. Sydney Smith compared the rejection of a reform bill by the House of Lords to the plight of Dame Partington.

die-hard See PERSEVERANCE.

hard-hat A working-class conservative, so called from the protective metal or plastic helmet worn by construction workers. The Sunday Mail (Brisbane, June, 1970) offers the following explanation of the term:

A “Hard Hat” is a construction worker, but his helmet symbolises all those beefy blue-collar workers who have suddenly become the knuckleduster on the strong right arm of President Nixon’s silent majority.

redneck An ultraconservative. This disparaging term usually refers to the poor white farmers of the Southern backwoods who are notorious for their purported intolerance of liberals, intellectuals, Blacks, and hippies. Redneck, originating as an allusion to a farmer’s perennially sunburned neck, is now an epithet for any person who shares similar prejudices.

right-wing Reactionary, conservative; averse to change, die-hard. The term reputedly arose from the seating arrangement of the French National Assembly of 1789, in which conservatives sat on the right side, or wing, of the chamber. As used today, right-wing, like left-wing, has pejorative connotations of extremism—in this case, of bigotry, prejudice, moneyed interests, anti-humanitarianism, etc. Both terms are used primarily to denigrate and stigmatize one’s opponents; a political conservative would not call himself a right-winger, just as a liberal would not call himself a left-winger; yet each might well label the other with the appropriate epithet.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conservatism - a political or theological orientation advocating the preservation of the best in society and opposing radical changes
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
neoconservatism - an approach to politics or theology that represents a return to a traditional point of view (in contrast to more liberal or radical schools of thought of the 1960s)
reaction - extreme conservatism in political or social matters; "the forces of reaction carried the election"
Translations
مُحافَظَه، مُقاوَمَة التَّغْيير
konzervatismus
konservatisme
konzervativizmus
íhaldssemi
konzervativizmus
tutuculuk

conservatism

[kənˈsɜːvətɪzəm] Nconservadurismo m

Conservatism

conservatism [kənˈsɜːrvətɪzəm] n (POLITICS)conservatisme m

conservatism

[kənˈsɜːrvətɪzəm] n (= conservative nature) → conservatisme m

conservatism

conservatism

[kənˈsɜːvətɪzm] nconservatorismo

conservation,

conservatism

etc see conserve

conserve

(kənˈsəːv) verb
to keep from changing, being damaged or lost. We must conserve the country's natural resources; This old building should be conserved.
noun
something preserved, eg fruits in sugar, jam etc.
ˌconserˈvation (kon-) noun
the act of conserving especially wildlife, the countryside, old buildings etc.
ˌconserˈvationist (kon-) noun
a person who is interested in conservation.
conˈservatism (-vətizəm) noun
dislike of change.
conˈservative (-tiv) adjective
1. disliking change. Older people tend to be conservative in their attitudes; conservative opinions.
2. in politics, wanting to avoid major changes and to keep business and industry in private hands.
References in classic literature ?
The plain Anglo-Saxon yeoman strain which was really the basis of his nature now asserted itself in the growing conservatism of ideas which marked the last forty years of his life.
An ardent liberal in youth, he, more quickly than Wordsworth, lapsed into conservatism, whence resulted his appointment as Poet Laureate in 1813 and the unremitting hostility of Lord Byron.
By this misfortune Clifford became rich; so did Hepzibah; so did our little village maiden, and, through her, that sworn foe of wealth and all manner of conservatism, --the wild reformer,--Holgrave!
Of late years, however, since his children were growing up, he had begun to value respectability, and had had himself made a magistrate; a position for which he was admirably fitted, because of his strong conservatism and his contempt for "foreigners.
He had also taken too much in the shape of muddy political talk, a stimulant dangerously disturbing to his farming conservatism, which consisted in holding that whatever is, is bad, and any change is likely to be worse.
Eight young bulls in the full prime of their vigor pressed forward to Zu-tag's side, but the old bulls with the conservatism and caution of many years upon their gray shoulders, shook their heads and waddled away after Go-lat.
We call it by many names,--fever, intemperance, insanity, stupidity and crime; they are all forms of old age; they are rest, conservatism, appropriation, inertia; not newness, not the way onward.
Irwine had a finely cut nostril and upper lip; but at present we can only see that he has a broad flat back and an abundance of powdered hair, all thrown backward and tied behind with a black ribbon--a bit of conservatism in costume which tells you that he is not a young man.
Just as I was opening the outer door, I remembered the twenty francs which I had not restored; I paused: impossible to carry them away with me; difficult to force them back on their original owner; I had now seen her in her own humble abode, witnessed the dignity of her poverty, the pride of order, the fastidious care of conservatism, obvious in the arrangement and economy of her little home; I was sure she would not suffer herself to be excused paying her debts; I was certain the favour of indemnity would be accepted from no hand, perhaps least of all from mine: yet these four five-franc pieces were a burden to my self-respect, and I must get rid of them.
Hypothesis: there is a relation between accounting conditional conservatism and accrual earnings management.
Conservatism in Canada, edited by James Farney and David Rayside, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 2013, 400 pp.
Synopsis: "Creating Conservatism: Postwar Words that Made an American Movement" charts the vital role of canonical post--World War II (1945--1964) books in generating, guiding, and sustaining conservatism as a political force in the United States.