considerable


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con·sid·er·a·ble

 (kən-sĭd′ər-ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Large in amount, extent, or degree: a writer of considerable influence.
2. Worthy of consideration; significant: The economy was a considerable issue in the campaign.
n. Informal
A considerable amount, extent, or degree.

con·sid′er·a·bly adv.

considerable

(kənˈsɪdərəbəl)
adj
1. large enough to reckon with: a considerable quantity.
2. a lot of; much: he had considerable courage.
3. worthy of respect: a considerable man in the scientific world.
conˈsiderably adv

con•sid•er•a•ble

(kənˈsɪd ər ə bəl)

adj.
1. rather large or great, as in size, distance, or extent: a considerable length of time.
2. worthy of respect or attention; important; distinguished.
n.
3. Informal. much; not a little.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin]
con•sid′er•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.considerable - large or relatively large in number or amount or extent or degree; "a considerable quantity"; "the economy was a considerable issue in the campaign"; "went to considerable trouble for us"; "spent a considerable amount of time on the problem"
big, large - above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"
inconsiderable - too small or unimportant to merit attention; "passed his life in an inconsiderable village"; "their duties were inconsiderable"; "had no inconsiderable influence"

considerable

adjective
1. large, goodly, much, great, marked, comfortable, substantial, reasonable, tidy, lavish, ample, noticeable, abundant, plentiful, tolerable, appreciable, sizable or sizeable We have already spent a considerable amount of money on repairs.
large small, insignificant, meagre, paltry, insubstantial

considerable

adjective
1. Notably above average in amount, size, or scope:
Informal: tidy.
Translations
كَبير، مُهِم، لا بأس بِه
významnýznačný
betydeligvæsentlig
umtalsverîur
znaten
bir hayliepeyce

considerable

[kənˈsɪdərəbl] ADJconsiderable
a considerable number of applicantsun número considerable de solicitudes
a considerable sum of moneyuna suma considerable de dinero
they achieved a considerable degree of successtuvieron un éxito considerable
we had considerable difficultytuvimos bastante dificultad
I'd been living in England for a or some considerable timellevaba bastante tiempo viviendo en Inglaterra
to a or some considerable extenten gran parte
the building suffered considerable damageel edificio sufrió daños de consideración

considerable

[kənˈsɪdərəbəl] adjconsidérable

considerable

adjbeträchtlich, erheblich; sum of money, achievement alsoansehnlich; loss also, interest, incomegroß; (used admiringly) number, size, achievement, effort etcbeachtlich; to a considerable extent or degreeweitgehend; to face considerable difficultiesmit beträchtlichen or erheblichen or gewaltigen Schwierigkeiten konfrontiert sein; for a or some considerable timefür eine ganze Zeit

considerable

[kənˈsɪdrəbl] adjconsiderevole, notevole
to a considerable extent → in gran parte, in misura notevole

consider

(kənˈsidə) verb
1. to think about (carefully). He considered their comments.
2. to feel inclined towards. I'm considering leaving this job.
3. to take into account. You must consider other people's feelings.
4. to regard as being. They consider him unfit for that job.
conˈsiderable adjective
great. considerable wealth; a considerable number of people.
conˈsiderably adverb
Considerably fewer people came than I expected.
References in classic literature ?
The banks of the river, for a considerable distance, both above and below the falls, have a volcanic character: masses of basaltic rock are piled one upon another; the water makes its way through their broken chasms, boiling through narrow channels, or pitching in beautiful cascades over ridges of basaltic columns.
A third has advanced along the Vladimir road, and a fourth, rather considerable detachment is stationed between Ruza and Mozhaysk.
Still, despite these colossal dimensions, the actual enlargements scarcely exceeded 6,000 times in round numbers; consequently, the moon was brought within no nearer an apparent distance than thirty-nine miles; and objects of less than sixty feet in diameter, unless they were of very considerable length, were still imperceptible.
And if you can't do that, you'll put up with considerable less; you'll go anywhere you CAN go, just so as to get away, and be thankful of the chance, too.
It is evident from the state of the country, from the habits of the people, from the experience we have had on the point itself, that it is impracticable to raise any very considerable sums by direct taxation.
The collection of thirty-three Hymns, ascribed to Homer, is the last considerable work of the Epic School, and seems, on the whole, to be later than the Cyclic poems.
The public are entreated to bear in mind that thirteen years have passed since it was finished, many more since it was begun, and that during that period, places, manners, books, and opinions have undergone considerable changes.
He rushed down towards the village calling out "Wolf, Wolf," and the villagers came out to meet him, and some of them stopped with him for a considerable time.
Why, yes," said the President; "by diligent effort so many men must have saved a considerable number of lives.
But on the 11th of April it rose suddenly, and land appeared at the mouth of the Amazon River, a vast estuary, the embouchure of which is so considerable that it freshens the sea-water for the distance of several leagues.
For a long time after it was ushered into this world of sorrow and trouble, by the parish surgeon, it remained a matter of considerable doubt whether the child would survive to bear any name at all; in which case it is somewhat more than probable that these memoirs would never have appeared; or, if they had, that being comprised within a couple of pages, they would have possessed the inestimable merit of being the most concise and faithful specimen of biography, extant in the literature of any age or country.
They generly had on yellow straw hats most as wide as an umbrella, but didn't wear no coats nor waistcoats, they called one another Bill, and Buck, and Hank, and Joe, and Andy, and talked lazy and drawly, and used considerable many cuss words.