consociation


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con·so·ci·a·tion

 (kən-sō′shē-ā′shən)
n.
1. Friendly or cooperative association, as between groups or organizations.
2. Ecology A subdivision of an association having one dominant species of plant.
3. A political arrangement in which various groups, such as ethnic or racial populations within a country or region, share power according to an agreed formula or mechanism.

con·so′ci·a′tion·al adj.

con•so•ci•a•tion

(kənˌsoʊ siˈeɪ ʃən, -ʃi-)

n.
1. the act of uniting in association.
2. an association of churches or religious orders.
3. a climax community in which one species is dominant.
[1585–95; < Latin]

Consociation

 a confederation of churches or religious bodies; an alliance or confederation.
Examples: consociation of acts of providence, 1645; of churches, 1646; of many of the worst acts, 1649; of good spirits, 1656; of tribes for plunder or defence, 1804.
References in classic literature ?
One was the artist Holgrave, who, in spite of his consociation with reformers, and his other queer and questionable traits, continued to hold an elevated place in Hepzibah's regard.
Portugal's aspiration to foster a Pan-Lusitanian community where Europeans and Africans associated freely may have rested heavily on consociation with African women, since Portuguese women did not settle in Africa in significant numbers until the 1940s.
For example, the adsorption band at 3520 [cm.sup.-1] is due to the consociation of hydroxyl and amino.
The performance of MANETs relies on the consociation of nodes in the network.
Kasapovic (Zagreb) in 2005 imposed and installed the term of consociation as territorial separation of the people in Bosnia and as the only possible model for the organization of the political system in Bosnia, followed by an orchestrated story of federalization and electoral units.
Governing Ethnic Conflict Consociation, Identity and the price of peace, New York: Rutledge.
constitutional recognition using the principle of consociation. (27)
European shareholder states were a consociation of sometimes cooperating and frequently competing powers: kings contended with nobles, contended with the church, contended with free cities and trade associations, and so on.
Consociation in Bonsia and Herzegovina: Practical Implementation of the Theoretical Principles.
(37.) Arend Lijphart, Consociation: The Model and its Applications
The solutions that these groups offered, federation and consociation, reflected the prevailing politics in these nations.
Sri Lanka's President Maithripala Sirisena called on all political parties to end politics of conflict and extend a helping hand to strengthen the politics of consociation initiated by the government.