consols


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con·sol

 (kŏn′sŏl, kən-sŏl′)
n.
often consols A government bond in Great Britain, originally issued in 1751, that pays perpetual interest and has no date of maturity. Also called bank annuity.

[Short for Consolidated Annuity.]

consols

(ˈkɒnsɒlz; kənˈsɒlz)
pl n
1. (Banking & Finance) irredeemable British government securities carrying annual interest rates of two and a half or four per cent. Also called: bank annuities
[short for consolidated stock]
Translations

consols

[ˈkɒnsɒlz] NPL (Brit) (Fin) → fondos mpl consolidados

consols

pl (Brit Fin) → Konsols pl, → konsolidierte Staatsanleihen pl

consols

[ˈkɒnsɒlz] npl (Stock Exchange) → titoli mpl del debito consolidato
References in classic literature ?
She sang Handel and Haydn to the family of evenings, and engaged in a large piece of worsted work, as if she had been born to the business and as if this kind of life was to continue with her until she should sink to the grave in a polite old age, leaving regrets and a great quantity of consols behind her--as if there were not cares and duns, schemes, shifts, and poverty waiting outside the park gates, to pounce upon her when she issued into the world again.
Consols"; for so it was that Becky felt the Vanity of human affairs, and it was in those securities that she would have liked to cast anchor.
Could the best and kindest of us who depart from the earth have an opportunity of revisiting it, I suppose he or she (assuming that any Vanity Fair feelings subsist in the sphere whither we are bound) would have a pang of mortification at finding how soon our survivors were consoled. And so Sir Pitt was forgotten--like the kindest and best of us--only a few weeks sooner.
Becky consoled herself by so balancing the chances and equalizing the distribution of good and evil in the world.
You'll put it into Consols, you will, and draw your three-ha'pence a year.
Mr Flower's remarks rankled particularly because it so happened that Consols were the identical investment on which he had decided.
"You're a tradesman," he told Philip, "you want to invest life in consols so that it shall bring you in a safe three per cent.
When the smash comes poor Margaret will have a nest-egg to fall back upon." This year Helen came of age, and exactly the same thing happened in Helen's case; she also would shift her money out of Consols, but she, too, almost without being pressed, consecrated a fraction of it to the Nottingham and Derby Railway.
'It was originally, I think, eight thousand pounds, Consols?' said Traddles.
"Work, you see, and land to cultivate are the poor man's consols. That good man would think himself disgraced if he went into the poorhouse or begged for his bread; he would choose to die pickaxe in hand, out in the open, in the sunlight.
Instead of issuing bonds with higher coupons as interest rates rose, which governments normally did in wartime, British governments from the 1750s onward relied mostly on 3 percent "Consols", i.e., perpetual bonds with a 3 percent coupon issued at deep discounts.